Dog, Cat & Pocket Pet Desexing | Geelong Vet | Dr Paws Anakie Road Vet Clinic | Anakie Road

Desexing

We recommend surgical desexing for all pets not intended for breeding.

The benefits of desexing your pet

Preventing the oversupply of dogs and cats

Throughout the animals shelters of Melbourne, many thousands of healthy dogs and cats are put down each year simply because we have too many of them within animal shelters.

Council registration is significantly cheaper for desexed pets.

Behavioural benefits

  • Decreased urge to wander, roam or escape
  • Calming influence on behaviour and a reduction in some aggressive behaviours.

Medical benefits

  • No ovarian, uterine or testicular cancer
  • Desexing prevents pyometra-a life-threatening disease in dogs
  • Desexing reduces mammary cancer and prostatic disease
  • Desexing prevents bi-yearly problems associated with on heat females, such as blood staining, male dogs visiting, or cat calling
  •  Decrease spraying in male cats
  • Decrease cat aggression and associated fighting, abscesses, and FIV

At what age should you desex your pet?

Desexing can be done safely at almost any age, depending on gender, size, health issues, and other factors.

Young pups and kittens are generally desexed at approximately 4-5 months of age.

For maximal benefit in decreasing mammary tumours, females (girls) should be spayed before their first season, which will occur from 5 to 6 months of age.

Dog Desexing

So it’s time to have your dog desexed? Here’s what you need to know…

What?

Canine Spey

A canine spey (ovariohysterectomy) is the complete removal of the ovaries and uterus through an incision made in the middle of the abdomen. The procedure is performed under full general anaesthetic and takes approximately 30-60 minutes to complete. In order to ensure a safe recovery from general anaesthetic, your dog will be required to spend the day in hospital.

Canine Castration

A canine castration (orchiectomy) is the complete removal of the male dogs' testes. The procedure is performed under full general anaesthetic and requires your dog to spend the day in hospital until fully recovered.

Why? 

Having your dog desexed is strongly recommended. When performed at a young age, desexing minimizes your dog’s risk of developing a number of conditions. In females, desexing will eliminate the chance of unwanted pregnancy, stop heat cycles and will reduce the risk of mammary cancer developing. In male dogs, desexing can reduce their desire to roam, fight and territorially spray, as well as eliminates the risk of testicular cancer.

Where?

Our surgical procedures take place at our clinic in a sterile surgical theatre.  

When?

We recommend desexing at 5-6 months of age, just prior to sexual maturity.

How?

Call our office during business hours to book your pet in for their desexing procedure (Elective Surgeries are performed Monday – Friday).

Price?

The price of dog desexing includes:

  • Pre-surgical consult with a vet or nurse
  • The surgical procedure
  • Patient-tailored anaesthesia
  • IV fluids therapy before, during, and after the procedure
  • A tattoo in your pets left ear to identify them as desexed, which is recognised nationwide
  • Post-operative pain relief

Speak with our reception staff for a specific quotation that has been tailored to your pet.

Anaesthetic Safety

In order to reduce the risk of general anaesthesia, we recommend that your pet have a Pre-anaesthetic Blood Panel performed on the day of surgery: it is a simple test that can be performed and analysed within our clinic. 

Pre-anaesthetic bloods allow us to assess your pet’s liver and kidney function; organs that are responsible for the safe metabolism and elimination of anaesthetic drugs. Additionally, PCV a volume percentage of red blood cells, is included as part of the test which can help us to identify disorders, such as anaemia, that can affect your pet during surgery.

We recommend this blood test for all patients undergoing general anaesthetic, regardless of age or physical health. Even if a pet is up to date with all prevention treatments, has no history of illness, and appears perfectly healthy, this is not always the case. The results of pre-anaesthetic blood tests allow us to tailor our anaesthetics protocols to each pet and ensure the safest outcome. 

Cat Desexing

So, it’s time to have your cat desexed? Here’s what you need to know

What?

Feline Spey

A feline spey (ovariohysterectomy) is the complete removal of the ovaries and uterus through an incision made in the middle or side of the abdomen. The procedure is performed under full general anaesthetic and takes approximately 30-60 minutes to complete. In order to ensure a safe recovery from general anaesthetic, your cat will be required to spend the day in hospital.

Feline Castration

A feline castration (orchiectomy) is the complete removal of the male cat’s testes. The procedure is performed under anaesthetic and requires your cat to spend the day in hospital until fully recovered.

Why? 

Having your cat desexed is strongly recommended. When performed at a young age, desexing minimizes your cats risk of developing a number of conditions. In females, conditions include, unwanted pregnancy, behaviour changes that occur around heat cycles, uterine infections and mammary cancer. In male cats desexing will reduce urine odour, the desire to roam, fight and territorially spray, reduces the risk of prostatic disease and perianal tumours, and eliminates incidence the risk of testicular cancer.

Where?

Our surgical procedures take place at our clinic in a sterile surgical theatre.  

When?

We recommend desexing at 5-6 months of age, just prior to sexual maturity. By desexing at this age, your cats chance of developing cancer will be significantly reduced.

How?

Call our office during business hours to book your pet in for their desexing procedure (Elective Surgeries are performed Monday – Friday).

Price?

The price of cat desexing includes:

  • Pre-surgical consult with a vet or nurse
  • The surgical procedure
  • Patient tailored anaesthesia
  • IV fluids
  • A tattoo in your pets left ear to identify them as desexed, which is recognised nationwide
  • Post-operative pain relief

Speak with our reception staff for a specific quotation that has been tailored to your pet.

Anaesthetic Safety

In order to reduce the risk of general anaesthesia, we recommend that your pet have a Pre-anaesthetic Blood Panel performed on the day of surgery: it is a simple test that can be performed and analysed within our clinic. 

Pre-anaesthetic bloods allow us to assess your pet’s liver and kidney function; organs that are responsible for the safe metabolism and elimination of anaesthetic drugs. Additionally, PCV a volume percentage of red blood cells, is included as part of the test which can help us to identify disorders, such as anaemia, that can affect your pet during surgery.

We recommend this blood test for all patients undergoing general anaesthetic, regardless of age or physical health. Even if a pet is up to date with all prevention treatments, has no history of illness, and appears perfectly healthy, this is not always the case. The results of pre-anaesthetic blood tests allow us to tailor our anaesthetics protocols to each pet and ensure the safest outcome. 

What happens on surgery day?

Desexing is often the first time your pet will stay at our clinic for any extended period of time and we do our best to make things as comfortable as possible.

Visit our clinics to learn more or contact us make an appointment.

More information

Please contact us at Dr Paws Anakie Road Veterinary Clinic if you'd like any more information. 

Serving the pet community of the City of Greater Geelong. The pawfect location for pet parents living in Bell Park, Geelong, North Geelong, Post Hill, Newcombe, Lara and surrounding areas!