Desexing Your Pet | North District Vet

You can help to stop unnecessary animal suffering by desexing your pet!

250,000 perfectly healthy animals are euthanised annually in Australia because there are not enough homes for them. We are now facing an oversupply of animals and it is heartbreaking to think that they will be put down. This oversupply proves the importance of desexing your animals.
Misconceptions and myths about desexing or spaying have led pet owners to avoid this procedure. However, the benefits of desexing far outweigh the negatives.
So here are the facts.

Desexing your animal will be beneficial in the long-term and provide you with a more balanced, healthier and happier pet!

Desexing is the removal of part of the reproductive system of an animal, while under a general anaesthetic. In females, the process is known as spaying  and in males castration or neutering.
Early age desexing has been proven to be entirely safe and of minimal risk to the animal and you don’t need to wait until 6 months when at that age they could possibly get pregnant or impregnate!

Prevent animal overpopulation and death

The number 1 reason why desexing is important is to reduce unwanted litters. A female cat that has NOT been desexed can produce more than 15 offspring per year, so the importance of desexing your pets is very relevant.
This large pet overpopulation problem results in thousands of unnecessary deaths per year. It does not matter if you have homes for all the litter, you are directly contributing to the pet overpopulation problem and restricting homes for those pets who need to be re-homed.
By desexing your pet, you lessen the number of stray animals (who may also go on and breed) and the number being euthanized, if unable to be re-homed. 
But the benefits of desexing do not end there.

Medical benefits of desexing

The medical benefits of desexing your pet are enormous. The risk of your female pet contracting diseases of the ovaries, uterus and cervix are eradicated once desexed. Life threatening diseases such as breast cancer and pyometra, a serious infection of the uterus are dramatically reduced. In males, castration reduces the risk of prostatic and perianal disease and completely eliminates the risk of testicular cancer.

Behavioural benefits of desexing

Many pet owners think their pet will ‘change’ in personality if desexed. This is incorrect.  However, your pet will no longer display many of the annoying sexual behaviours such as:

  • Humping you, other animals or your furniture
  • Spraying or marking their territory around the house
  • Male dominance and aggression problems
  • Roaming

It will make your pet a better behaved pet, one who is not controlled by sexual instincts.  Therefore they are far less likely to act aggressively or behave badly in the community.
Your pet will get into many less fights around the neighbourhood. This decreases the risk of abscesses caused by fighting and reduces the risk of diseases such as FIV. Pets who have been desexed are far less likely to roam, because they are no longer seeking out other animals to mate with.

Myths about desexing

Despite the numerous benefits of desexing/spaying your pet, there are numerous misconceptions that deter pet owners from this procedure:

  • A female should have a litter before being desexed. This is untrue.

In fact, there is absolutely no advantage to allowing a female to breed before desexing her. If not desexed, she risks catching a number of diseases related to sexual activity, pregnancy and giving birth.

  • Desexing is cruel. This is untrue.

This myth is actually far from the truth and on the contrary, not desexing your animal is cruel. You’re putting them at a far greater health risk throughout their lives, such as mammary cancer in cats, which is the third most common tumours found in female cats. Desexed pets, on average, live longer their non-desexed counterparts!

  • Males can't get pregnant, so it doesn't matter. This is untrue.

Male pets can impregnate numerous females in a very short period of time, contributing to the overpopulation issue and putting him at many unnecessary risks. More commonly male pets have a higher risk of testicular cancer and prostate issues. Even more concerning, undesexed males have a higher tendency to behave aggressively and escape from their homes in search for a mate.

It's every pet owner's responsibility to make sure their cat or dog is desexed, regardless of whether it is male or female.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Vaccinations: still the best protection against serious animal diseases

In July 2012, there was an outbreak of Canine Parvovirus in Melbourne pet stores. This led the Australian Veterinary Association to issue a warning to all pet owners to vaccinate against the disease. This kind of event is why all vets and animal welfare groups across Australia agree that pet vaccination is just as important as it has ever been!
Just like in humans, vaccinating your pet is very important in managing the health of your pet. It builds their immune system and protects against fatal and incredibly serious and painful diseases. Vaccines have saved millions of pet lives. And even though some once common diseases are now rare, this is because of vaccinations.

How do pet vaccinations work?

A vaccine is given to your pet to help prepare their body's immune system to fight the invasion of disease-causing organisms. Vaccines contain antigens, which look like the disease-causing organism to the immune system, but don't actually cause disease. When the vaccine is introduced to the body, the immune system is mildly stimulated so if your pet is ever exposed to the real disease, their immune system is now prepared to recognise and fight it off entirely or reduce the severity of the illness.  Just as a flu vaccination works for humans.

Which diseases do we commonly vaccinate against in pets?

The diseases we vaccinate dogs against are parovirus, distemper, canine hepatitis, canine cough (kennel cough), parainfluenza and bordatella. We vaccinate cats routinely against feline enteritis, feline herpes, feline calcivirus, FIV (feline AIDS) and chlamydia. We also commonly vaccinate ferrets against distemper and rabbits against calcivirus.  These diseases are either fatal or incredibly life-threatening. By learning more about the diseases we are trying to protect, we hope that all pet owners will stay up-to-date with their beloved pet's vaccinations.

Canine parvovirus

Canine parvovirus, also known as parvo, is a highly contagious disease. The disease is transmitted by oral contact with infected feces. It is a highly infectious virus that attacks the gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular systems of dogs. Young puppies and dogs that have not been vaccinated are particularly susceptible. It is very important to vaccinate against parvo, as the death rate in young non-vaccinated puppies can be greater than 80 per cent. In July 2012, there was an outbreak of parvo in Melbourne pet stores, as mentioned above.
The symptoms of parvo include depression, vomiting, diarrhoea (sometimes containing mucus or blood). Some dogs may have a fever, some may not. A tucked-up appearabce in the abdomen is common, as well as rapid dehydration. Parvo affects dogs of all ages, but most cases occur in puppies 6 to 20 weeks of age. The most efficient way to diagnose parvo is an in-house blood serum test is available for rapid diagnosis.

Canine distemper

Canine distemper is a contagious, incurable, multisystemic viral disease that affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal and central nervous systems and which is often fatal. Early symptoms include: fever, loss of appetite and mild eye inflammation that may only last a day or two. Symptoms become more serious and noticeable as the disease progresses. Many dogs experience gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms, such as conjunctivitis (discharge from the eye), diarrhoea, fever (usually present but unnoticed) pneumonia (cough, difficulty breathing), runny nose and vomiting.

Canine hepatitis

Young dogs and unvaccinated dogs are at the highest risk of being infected with the virus, causing infectious canine hepatitis. Very young puppies tend to develop the most serious illness.
Infectious canine hepatitis can cause a range of symptoms. Some dogs show very mild symptoms, but in severe cases the disease can be fatal. Symptoms to look out for include; fever, loss of appetite, lethargy, runny eyes and nose, cough and vomiting. Bleeding under the skin, bruising in the mouth, a swelling of the head, neck and trunk due to fluid accumulation in abdomen, jaundice (yellowish tinge to skin,) seizures, increased thirst and urination, and clouding of the cornea is seen in some animals later on in the course of disease.

Kennel cough

Canine cough or kennel cough is an upper respiratory infection affecting dogs. It is caused by a combination of the canine parainfluenza virus and the bacteria, bordetella bronchiseptica. It is highly contagious. Kennel cough is so named because the infection can spread quickly among dogs in the close quarters of a kennel or animal shelter.

Viral and bacterial causes of kennel cough are spread by sneezing and coughing. Most causes of kennel cough are highly contagious, even days or weeks after symptoms disappear. Symptoms usually begin two to three days after exposure and can progress to lower respiratory infections, such as pneumonia. Symptoms can include a harsh, dry cough, retching, sneezing, snorting, gagging or vomiting, in response to light pressing of the throat or after excitement or exercise. The disease can last initially from 10 to 20 days and can rebreak when the dog is put into a stressful situation which puts stress on the dog's immune system.

Canine parainfluena

Canine parainfluenza is a highly contagious respiratory disease that is frequently confused with kennel cough. Canine parainfluenza is a major factor that can cause kennel cough. The disease can progress to pneumonia in puppies or chronic bronchitis in older dogs. Symptoms include a runny nose, a cough and laboured breathing.

Bordetella

Bordetella is a form of respiratory disease in dogs. It is one of several viral and bacterial agents responsible for kennel cough bordetella is highly contagious and easily transmitted through the air or direct contact with an infected source.

When your puppy/dog should be vaccinated:

Age (Weeks old) 6-8 12-14 16-18 Yearly
Vaccination C3 C5 C5 C5


        
Protection from cat diseases

The F3 vaccination protects against feline enteritis, as well as two forms of feline respiratory disease.

Feline enteritis

Feline enteritis, is a highly contagious viral disease. Affected cats are depressed, lose their appetite and have vomiting and/or diarrhoea. Many cats, especially the old and very young, can die of this disease and pregnant queens may lose their young or give birth to kittens with brain damage. Cats that do recover may continue to carry the virus for some time and will be infectious to other cats.

Feline respiratory disease

Feline respiratory disease, otherwise known as cat flu, is usually caused by feline herpes virus and/or feline calicivirus. Feline respiratory disease can affect cats of all ages but is especially common in young kittens. The viruses cause sneezing, runny eyes, a discharge from the nose and ulcers in the mouth, predominantly the tongue. Cats will lose their appetite and have a high fever. The disease is distressing and can last for many weeks despite treatment. Cats will often become lifelong carriers of the disease, even once recovered, and can have recurrences of the signs regularly throughout their lives particularly when stressed and the lowered function of the immune system in consequence.

F4: Extra protection from chlamydia

The F4 vaccination covers all areas the F3 covers, with the added benefit of cover from chlamydia virus. Chlamydia in cats presents as an upper respiratory infection which will cause symptoms such as conjunctivitis and other forms of lung infection such as pneumonia.

FIV- Feline Immunodeficiency virus vaccination

The feline equivalent of HIV or human AIDS is the feline immunodeficiency virus. Like in humans, it is caused by a virus that makes it extremely difficult for the immune system to fight off disease. Also like humans, any infected cats remain symptomless carriers for some time before developing symptoms, but are able to infect other cats.

Infected cats may have repeated infections or illness that does not respond to treatment as expected. Weight loss, poor coat quality, loss of appetite and fever can also occur. Eventually the immune system may become too weak to fight off other infections or diseases and as a result the cat may die. Infection is often spread through fighting with other cats. Many stray or tomcats carry the virus, so it is very important to vaccinate your cat against it as it is very common.

When your kitten/cat should be vaccinated:

Age (weeks old) 6-8 12-14 16-18 Yearly
Vaccination F3 F3 or F4 F3 or F4 F3 or F4 Booster


Contact us at Dr Paws Veterinary Clinic to learn more or to make a vaccination appointment.

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Heartworm: the silent, slow killer

Heartworm is a silent, slow killer. Symptoms are usually not present until the severe stage of the disease and so is largely undetected until serious damage has already occurred. However, it is one disease that can be easily and totally prevented via ongoing preventative medication.

Prevention is still crucial. The disease is still prevalent in Australia amongst the fox population. Therefore, it is ongoing preventative treatment that is keeping rates low in dog and cat populations!

What is Heartworm disease?

Heartworm is transmitted via mosquitos, who bite an infected carrier. This includes feral, uncontrolled animals such as foxes, who subsequently infects another animal. It is endemic throughout mainland Australia in foxes. Heartworm is more common in  foxes than in your dogs and cats. However, it is still a huge issues if your pet is not protected.

After being infected by a mosquito, worms undergo several life stages. They breed continually, until adult worms eventually start to grow inside a pet's heart and lungs, causing serious damage. These worms can grow up to 30cm long, and are a major barrier to the free passage of blood from the heart to the lungs. The infection slowly progresses. The heart begins to dilate, becomes weak and in the lungs, the worms cause scarring and a build-up of fluid.

Sudden death is the most obvious symptom of heartworm disease, along with a persistent cough that progressively becomes worse over time. Lethargy sets in and the dog will not be able to exercise without serious cough and breathing issues. Fluid accumulates throughout the abdomen, causing a bloated appearance.

In cats heartworm disease can take up to 2 years. It is not quite as serious as a cat’s immune system is far superior at recognising foreign parasites. However, serious disease can be caused with just one worm, whereas in dogs, 1 or 2 worms are usually well tolerated. Unfortunately, the most common sign of the disease in cats is sudden death, but if your cat is struggling to breathe or coughing, you should also be concerned.

Heartworm treatments

Most Heartworm treatments must be administered monthly for full effectiveness, and unfortunately most pet owners simply forget or are unaware of the importance of full protection. They often don't realise that even 1 missed month leaves their pet vulnerable.

Recommended Heartworm prevention for dogs

We highly recommend a product called ProHeart SR12, as the most efficient, cost-effective and easy-to-remember product on the market. A once yearly injection, as opposed to a monthly tablet, ProHeart SR12 kills heartworm at every stage of development, unlike other products on the market that generally only kill adult heartworm. SR12 is approved for feeding dogs and bitches as well as heartworm positive dogs. There is an extremely low rate of adverse reaction and it's safe from 12 weeks of age.

The first dosage of SR12 coincides with your dog’s 12 week vaccinations. There is a 3-month reachback, meaning that even if your puppy was infected by a mosquito in the 12 week period, the heartworms will be killed. This effectively protects your puppy from birth. At 6 months, the second treatment is administered. At 15 months of age, the third and subsequent annual treatments coincide with vaccination. Each single dose after the initial 3 will provide your dog with continuous 12 month protection no other product can provide.

Choosing SR12 takes the burden of heartworm protection out of the owner's hands and into the vet's, putting both parties at ease and making for a happier, healthier dog. This reinforces the need for annual health checks, as your dog will already be in the clinic and eliminates non-compliance with monthly treatment.

Recommended Heartworm treatments for cats

ProHeart SR12 is not approved for use in cats, however Instead, Revolution is a very safe and efficient protectant. Revolution protects both cats and dogs from fleas, ear mites, hookworm, roundworm and shipworm. When used in conjunction with Canex, it also provides protection from tapeworm and sarcoptic mange. Revolution is the only product on the market which kills fleas at every stage of development, while also killing fleas that live in your home.

Protect your cat and dog from this silent killer.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

As we enter the holiday season, we start to consider where or who will look after our pets while we're away.

Besides considering the quality of care at kennels or pet boarding, you also need to be cautious of an outbreak of canine cough – a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease. Our vets report a spike in incidences during the colder months and holiday seasons.

Canine cough is also known as kennel cough. The name 'kennel cough' originated from the place the disease is most likely occur, the boarding kennel or the local pound. Canine cough is a common problem that our dogs continually struggle with. While the prevalence of canine cough is hard to determine exactly, it is still common and very contagious. Similar to the whooping cough in humans, the disease has the potential to become fatal unless vaccinated against.

Kennel cough can be caught anywhere that has been contaminated. In order to avoid your dog catching the virus, an annual vaccination will help reduce the chances of catching canine cough. The vaccination protects against the fatal strains of the disease and reduces symptoms by 80%. Boarding kennels and obedience classes will require that your dog has been vaccinated before attending.

"A vaccinated dog is much more protected than an unvaccinated dog. This means, they will get less sick and improve quicker. In many cases, vaccinated dogs are exposed to disease without getting sick at all, due to the immunity from the vaccination," notes Dr. Selma Gotsbacher, from Dr Paws.

However, there are a number of different strains of parainfluenza (that we also vaccinate against) that cause canine cough. Sometimes your dog may be exposed to a strain that is not fully covered by the vaccination and have a short stint of coughing. Like humans, who catch the flu even if they have had a flu vaccination, your dog may still catch a cough (even if vaccinated against the more serious strains of canine cough). Also similarly to humans, immunity from canine cough vaccination wanes after 6 to 12 months and therefore it is not only highly important to keep onto of your dogs annual vaccinations.

Treatment of kennel cough

Dr. Gotsbacher recommends that you make sure a vet confirms your dog has kennel cough. Once diagnosed, there are a few things that can help your dog:

  • Medication recommended by your vet
  • Keeping your dog quiet and comfortable. Barking a lot can make recovery longer and lead to secondary bacterial infections
  • Feeding softer food, if throat is very sore
  • Humidifying your dog’s airways, as demonstrated by a vet

You must also keep your dog separate from other dogs for 3 weeks. 

  • To walk your dog during this time, try to:
  • Walk later at night after most dogs have been out
  • Walk on lead only so you can stop your dog saying hello to other dogs
  • Keep away from popular dog areas

A healthy and otherwise disease free dog will recover more quickly. Puppies and older dogs are more at risk of serious complications from kennel cough.

Please contact us to learn more or if you are concerned about coughing in your dog.

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Meet Domino the adorable rabbit, while Dr Paws teaches you the best way to handle her, to avoid hurting her spine.

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Learn the best way to identify whether your dog is obese. Plus, Dr Paws has some great diet tips for pooch Tulip, who needs to shed a few pounds.

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Why cats scratch furniture

Cats naturally need to mark their territory by scratching things. This leaves both a visual and scent mark to say it belongs to them. It also sharpens their claws and gives them great pleasure.

A cat scratching post can help

To spare your furniture, a scratching post (or two) is highly recommended for your cat.

During scratching, cats like to stretch their body out and really dig their claws in – both vertically and sometimes horizontally. Therefore, the best scratching posts are tall with real carpet lining and sometimes even sisal rope wrapped around vertical and horizontal platforms. Your cat will also enjoy the many levels and vantage points offered by a tall and robust scratching post.

There are now many places you can purchase good quality scratching posts, including several rescue organisations.

Where to place your cat’s scratching post

If you can afford to, it is better to purchase more than one scratching post to place in different parts of its territory. You cat will aim to scratch the post to signal its territory and presence.

Sample positions include the following:

  • Near a window, preferably behind a couch 
  • Near a front door, especially if there is some open space and windows nearby
  • Close to its bed, so it can get up and have a good stretch and scratch
  • Near its litter tray, best for the more cost-effective, easy-to-clean scratching posts

Please note that the final decision of preferred location lies with your cat! If it has not used the post for several days, in spite of your encouragement, you will need to try a new position.

Ways to encourage your cat to use the scratching post

  • Dangle hanging toys from the scratching post
  • Feed your cat on the scratching post. Dry food is best
  • Use cat attractants, such as Feliway spray or cat nip on/around the scratching post
     

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Cats can be very territorial, so moving house is stressful for them. Planning ahead will ensure that the transition from one home to another goes smoothly.

If your cat is particularly nervous it may be advisable to place them in a cattery the day before the move and collect the day after you are established in your new home.

Moving day

Before the removal van arrives put the cat carrier, cat bed, food bowl, water bowl and litter tray in one room and ensure the door and windows remain shut. Place a notice on the door, so that removalists and family members know that this door must be kept shut!

When all other rooms have been emptied, the contents of the cat’s room can be placed in the van last. Before the furniture is removed your cat should be placed in the cat carrier and put safely in the car for the move.

Transporting your cat

If your cat is a nervous traveller, please contact us as they may be able to prescribe a mild sedative. Feed your cat as normal but ensure the mealtime is at least three hours before travelling.

Spray the inside of the cat carrier with Feliway half-an-hour before you place your cat inside. Feliway is a synthetic analogue of a cat facial pheremone and will make your cat more relaxed.

Place the carrier securely in the back of the car where it cannot move around. Do not transport your cat in the removal van or in the boot of the car.

At the new house

Place a Feliway diffuser in a floor level socket in the new room where your cat will be temporarily confined. Once the room is ready, your cat can be placed inside with their bed, food bowl, water bowl and litter tray and the door shut. If possible, a family member can sit in the room with your cat for a while as they explore.

Offer your cat some food

Once the removal has been completed your cat can be allowed to investigate the rest of the house one room at a time. It is important to remain as calm as possible to signal to your cat that it is a safe environment.

Helping your cat to settle in

Keep your cat indoors for at least 2 weeks to get her used to the new environment. Try to maintain the same routine you had at the old house, to make your cat more comfortable.  Continue to use a Feliway diffuser. Preferably use 2 or 3 so the effect is felt throughout the entire house.

Letting your cat outside

Keep your cat indoors for a couple of weeks to get used to the new property. Make sure your cat has some form of identification with their name, address and contact phone number. Remember to inform the microchip registering company of your change of address and phone number.

Introduce your cat to the outdoors gradually by initially opening the door and going into the garden with them. Always keep the door open initially so that they can escape indoors if something frightens them.

Preventing your cat from returning
to their old home

If your new home is nearby, your cat may try to find familiar routes that take them back to their old home. It is wise to warn the new occupants that your cat may return and ask them to contact you if they are seen.

It is important that the new occupants do not feed them or encourage them in any way. If you have moved locally it would be beneficial to keep your cat indoors as long as possible. However, this is rarely a practical option since those cats likely to return to previous hunting grounds will not relish being confined for such a long period.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Animals experience feelings of grief and depression just like people. Signs that a pet may be grief-stricken include a loss of appetite, an increase in sleep, depression, restlessness, aimless wandering, confusion and/or excessive barking or meowing. The loss of another pet or a human family member can bring about these signs of grief in your pet.

Mourning can take up to 6 months for our pets, although times of a month or so are more usual. A pet will often be seen searching to house for their missing companion. If you see this happening, feel free to give your grieving pet something that still holds the scent of his lost companion and let them be comforted by it.

It is common for a grieving pet to demand more affection and attention from others. Extra love and affection can be a healing comfort to both you and your pet. Your pet needs extra love and affection just as a person would during a time of mourning, but be careful not to mistakenly reward certain behaviors that you don’t want your pet to adopt permanently.

It is acceptable to hand out extra dog treats or bring out the catnip more frequently if you see your pet is sad, but keep it balanced. If you are worried your pet is becoming dependent on these treats, try to distract your pet during sad times by playing with them, taking them for a walk or talking to them.

Keep your pet’s routine as normal as possible, as this will give your pet some stability and something to look forward to. Maintain consistency in exercise, feeding schedules and the amount of attention being given. Eventually your pet will return to their normal behaviour.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Starting from a young age is the best way to make nail clips less stressful for you and your pet. Dr Paws and Honey the dog show you how to clip for pain-free results.

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

The season is upon us where it is acceptable to undo our belts and have an afternoon nap after Christmas lunch, however giving in to our pets puppy dog eyes when they are begging for some leftovers under the table may be causing more harm than good.

The Australian Veterinary Association warns all pet owners to refrain from feeding our animals the Christmas leftovers as some foods can be toxic to our furry friends including garlic and onions, chocolate and avocados. All of these foods can be responsible for damage to the heart and lungs, gastric irritation and anaemia.

Inflammation of the pancreas can be a result of feeding your pet rich meats, stuffing and crackle. Dr Gloria Perkovic suggests that ‘Any rich foods that are high in fat cause the pancreas, an organ near the stomach which produces digestive enzymes, to go into overdrive. This causes a range of symptoms including loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea, severe stomach pain and even collapse’.

Christmas is surrounded with joy and cheer which can in fact, can inadvertently have a negative effect on our pets. Many human foods can cause serious illness to our pets so it is important to take caution when choosing which treats to give to your pets, here is a list of foods you should keep your four legged friend away from this holiday season:

  • Cooked bones can splinter and damage the throat and intestines
  • Avoid feeding your pets meat scraps that contain marinades and gravies, this can cause a tummy upset
  • Chocolate can cause vomiting, diarrhoea, muscle twitching, increased urination and excessive panting.
  • Onions and Garlic can cause gastric irritation
  • Rich meats can cause inflammation of the pancreas
  • Stuffing causes inflammation of the pancreas
  • Avocados can cause heart damage
  • Raisins, sultanas and grapes- they can cause kidney failure
  • Any sweet treats containing ‘Christmas cheer’ is a big no no: as our pets are much more sensitive to alcohol than humans.

 

So what can you treat your pet with this Christmas? Dr. Perkovic recommends ‘saving the left over pork crackle for Boxing Day and give your furry friend a healthy treat that is good for their teeth like a Greenie or a Dentabone instead.’

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

During our hot Australian summer, our pets feel the heat just as much as we do.  However, unlike us pets can’t sweat. In order to regulate their body temperature they must pant. If unable to do so our pets could suffer from heat stress and heat stroke, and could become dangerous or even fatal.

Dogs and cats who are of geriatric age or those who have shorter airways (pugs or bulldogs) and respiratory problems are at more risk of overheating than others because they are unable to regulate their body temperature as quickly.

Tips for surviving the summer sun:

- If possible, keep your pet indoors in an air-conditioned environment

- Leave many water bowls with ice blocks around, especially in cool shady areas.
-If outside, fill a kiddies wadding pool with 1-2inches of water and leave in a shady spot so your dog play in it. Also, ensure lots of shady areas for your pet to lie in.

-Avoid exercising your dog, especially around midday when our hot sun seems to reach it’s peak temperature.

-Groom your dog or longhaired cat to suit the weather and avoid fur matting.

-Never leave your pet in the car, even when parked in the shade,  as the temperature inside a car becomes very hot quickly which one of the leading causes of heat stress or stroke and can be rapidly fatal.

Signs of a heat stressed pet:

Excessive panting
Sticky, dry gums
Vomiting/diarrhea
Appears stressed or agitated
Lethargic or reluctant to move
Seizures

 

If you suspect your pet has heat stress seek veterinary advice immediately. Wet them down with luke-warm water and ensure they have plenty of water to drink near them. Do not cover them with a wet towel as this creates an insulation layer which traps the heat.

It is important that even if your pet seems to recover fine to get them checked out by a vet to prevent organ damage from the dramatic body temperature change.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Pets have the ability to bring a great amount of love into any household. Good preparation, giving your new pet time to adjust and rewarding good behaviour will help smooth your new pet’s transition into your household.

 

Choose your new pet wisely

It is important to consider the personality of your current pet. Think about how your pet acts around you and other pets before choosing a new addition to your family. If your dog is an enthusiastic ‘cat chaser’ it may not be a good idea to introduce a new cat to the household.

 

Give your new pet time to adjust to its new surroundings

Moving into a new home is a big challenge; let your pet get used to his/her surroundings before introducing them to other household pets. To do this, you may want to separate your new pet from your current pets by putting them in separate areas of your house.  Swapping their toys or blankets may help to familiarise them with each other’s scent.

 

Introduce new pets slowly

Just like us, first impressions between our pets can be very important. When the time comes to introduce your new pet, introduce them slowly. Make sure you have good control over your pets in these early interactions. In some cases it may be better to introduce your pets in a neutral setting, such as a park or friend’s house. Gradually increase the time of interaction as your pets become comfortable with each other.

 

Reward good behaviour and avoid punishment

Offer praise, treats, toys and affection to promote positive interactions. If there is a conflict, do not punish your pets as this can create more confusion. Simply separate your animals and give them some space to themselves before their next interaction.

 

Supervise closely

Pay attention to the way in which your pets are interacting. Dr. Jennings says “it is wise never to leave your newly introduced pets alone to ‘work it out’ on their own”. They should be supervised at all times until they are completely comfortable with each other.

 

Be patient

Friendships take time to develop and your pets will need time to adjust to each other. Taking things slowly will make it easier for you to achieve a friendly and loving household between your pets.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Summer’s finally here! And with the return of the longer, warmer days, Summer is a great time to get out there and get active with your dog! However, there are a few things to be particularly mindful of as you’re having fun with your dog this festive season.


As you start to fire up the barbecue again, remember that onions and garlic can be highly toxic to our dogs. Cooked bones can also cause damage to your dog’s intestines that may require surgery. And don’t let them get to the oil from the barbecue or feed them highly fatty meat, as this can cause severe gastro and or even a condition called pancreatitis, that again requires hospitalization for supportive care.

The return of the hot weather means our dogs will start to lie around and soak up the sun rays for hours on end. And whilst they may love the rays, our dogs can also get aggressive forms of skin cancer. Dogs with light colour noses or thin haired bellies that lie stretched out on their back can be at higher risk, so make sure you pick up some dog sunscreen from us to help keep your dog covered.

Another thing to be mindful of this time of year is heat stroke, which occurs when your dog’s body warms up beyond the level that their body can cope with. This can occur after bouts of extreme exercise, being locked in cars or having no access to water. Brachycephalic dogs, which means dogs with short faces, like pugs and Cavaliers, are even more prone to heat stroke. If your pet is panting uncontrollably, anxious, lethargic, vomiting or feels very hot, please come and see us immediately as heat stroke requires rapid veterinarian attention.


And, unfortunately the hot weather means that snakes will be active again and are more of a threat on hotter days. The most common snake bites are brown and tiger snakes, and the venom is highly lethal to our dogs. If you have seen or suspect your dog has been bitten, keep them quiet and if possible carry them to the car and take them to your vet immediately, as they will need antivenom and life saving treatment.

Fleas also love the warm weather and the best time for fleas to breed is summer. So now, more than ever, make sure you’re up to date with flea control for all of your pets. There are lots of different options to choose from, so feel to drop in and have a chat about which product is best suited to your dog.

As always, make your dog’s health a priority this Summer, and from all the team, we wish you and your dog lots of fun in the beautiful weather.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Summer’s finally here! And for your cat this means they can enjoy being more active and spending a lot more time outdoors making the most of the longer, warmer days! However, there are a few things to be particularly mindful of as you’re having fun with your cat this festive season.

The long, warm summer nights can also mean that wandering cats are more likely to get into fights. The wounds can be painful and will require veterinary care, sometimes even surgery. Cat bites can also spread a disease called feline AIDS, which is unfortunately invariably fatal. You can greatly reduce your cat’s risk of sustaining injuries or contracting FIV by bringing them in before the sun starts to set, having them desexed and by vaccinating them against feline AIDs.

On hotter days, our cats often love to lie out in the sun to catch the warmth of the sunrays.  And like humans, cats can develop aggressive forms of skin cancer, particularly around their nose, ears and eyes. Cats with white coats are more prone to skin cancer, so make sure you pick up some pet friendly sunscreen from us to help keep your cat covered this summer.

Also, be aware that snakes are a potential threat during summer, particularly on warmer days. If you notice your cat has become lethargic and is having difficulty walking, or if you have seen or suspect your cat has been bitten, keep them quiet and bring them down to see us immediately, as they will need antivenom and life saving treatment.

Fleas also love the warm weather and the best time for fleas to breed is summer. So now, more than ever, make sure you’re up to date with flea control for all of your pets. There are lots of different options to choose from, so feel to drop in and have a chat about which product is best suited to your cat.

As always, make your cat’s health a priority this festive season and from all the team, we wish you and your cat a fun and healthy Summer.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

‘Tis the season for skin allergies!

 

Coming out of the colder months and into Spring generally puts a smile on everybody’s face, but it can also be the season for skin allergies for our pets.

With this in mind, we have put together some helpful tips and advice to help you cope with your pet’s itchy skin!

 

Allergies are a common cause of skin conditions in dogs and cats and arise from an animal’s differing levels of sensitivity to allergens from common substances like pollen, weeds, dust, mites, trees, mold or grasses.

 

Unfortunately, allergies can sometimes be difficult to control, which can be frustrating for pet owners. However, there are actions you can take in order to minimize this frustration.

 

Grooming

Brushing your pet regularly will ensure that their coat is healthy and prevent matting. It will also allow you to keep an eye out for any skin irritation. Additionally, using natural, hypoallergenic soaps and shampoos at bath time will limit aggravation of your pet’s skin, which may already be sensitive.

 

Diet

Providing your pet with a healthy and balanced diet is very important in order to maintain their overall health, and will directly impact your pet’s skin sensitivity. If you are unsure whether your pet’s diet is up to scratch we are happy to help you make some changes! Feel free to head down to the clinic or ask us any questions on Facebook.

 

Examination

If you are concerned about your pet’s skin health, the best action to take is to make an appointment at the veterinary clinic. Identifying the allergy, or the underlying cause of your pet’s irritation, is not always simple but examining your pet and having all the physical information can provide a lot of clues. These will ensure that when it comes to your pet’s skin health, we able to make informed decisions and actions.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Animal adoption is an option that more and more Australians are embracing as a responsible and compassionate way to find their perfect pet-match. 

Not only does adopting save a life, it has lots of other benefits for potential pet parents as well.


Top reasons to adopt!

 

You know that your pet will be a purrfect match for you and your lifestyle!

A part of the adoption process is working with the rescue organisation to determine your expectations of a pet. Important discussion topics would be your lifestyle, living arrangements and whether you have other pets.

Answering personal lifestyle questions is important; it will allow you and the rescue organisation to assess whether you have the time, the space and the genuine interest in committing to looking after a pet for the rest of their life. Essentially, it is in your best interest and the animals’ to determine whether adoption is a viable option for you before meeting any new animal faces!

Moving forward, this information will assist the rescue organisation in working out which animals will be compatible with you. Reputable rescue organisations will also assess the temperament and basic training of the animals that are available for adoption. For example, certain temperaments may not suit a “multiple-pet” home, whereas other animals may fit perfectly in a home with children, animal friends and lots of action and fun!


You know that what you see is what you get!

The majority of rescue animals are adults, and therefore their personalities are developed. Additionally, adult animals are generally settled, and often more patient around young children.

Animals that have been in foster care while awaiting their forever home will often be well socialised and taught basic manners. This is a major plus as it means that you are not starting from scratch, like you would be if you chose to bring home an untrained and attention-seeking puppy or kitten!


You are supported throughout the process of choosing your new pet!

Introducing a new pet into your life is an exciting and challenging time.

There are a lot of things to consider, and having the support and understanding of fellow animal lovers makes a huge difference!

Ultimately, animal rescue organisations want a happy ending, and to work with you to ensure that you find the perfect pet-match and save a life in the process.

The aim of adoption is to give loving, deserving animals forever homes, and this is why rescue organisations have a screening process.

Although sometimes time consuming, a detailed screening process is of great value. It demonstrates the rescue organisation’s commitment to maintaining the interests of the potential adoptive parents, and the welfare of their animals.

All parties involved in the adoption process want it to work out! That’s why it is so important to be open. Ask any questions and address any concerns you may have about adopting, the animals and even the organisation itself.


Adoption is inexpensive

Animals adopted from reputable rescue organisations will have been health checked, micro-chipped, wormed, vaccinated and de-sexed (if of breeding age). To cover these expenses, if only in part, they charge an adoption fee. On the other hand, if you buy a pet from a pet shop or breeder, these health considerations will come on top of the price of the animal, and be your responsibility to organise.

From this point of view, considering the cost of animals bought from pet shops or breeders, the price of a rescue animal is inexpensive.


These are just some of the reasons that adoption is a great option for anyone thinking about welcoming a new pet into their life.
It is such a rewarding experience, and certainly a situation in which everyone wins! 

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

"Is pet insurance worth it?"

It’s a question asked by many pet owners, and definitely one that is worth exploring!

Just like any member of the family, your pet can experience health issues and require serious medical attention at any time. It’s a part of life but it can prove costly and leave you seriously out-of-pocket. For example, in cases of serious illness your vet could perform specialty surgery or refer you to an emergency hospital. The fees will often prove higher than normal but having access to the best facilitates and treatments can be the difference between a successful or unsuccessful recovery for your pet.

There are so many options available when it comes to pet insurance, so it is important to do some solid research and remember that covers can often be customised to help meet your needs and budget. Additionally, it can help provide your pet with access to additional services like dental health.

It is important to bear in mind that there may be restrictions on cover based on an animal’s age. This is due to older animals tending to have greater health issues, although don’t let this completely put you off considering pet insurance for a young pet. If you do have a young pet you will already know that they are ever curious and clumsy characters. They are just as likely to contract diseases from eating something they shouldn’t off the ground, or literally running into trouble and breaking a toe while speeding to get that toy.

The future is bright for our pets, in terms of the quality of healthcare, new technologies and treatments. Our pets deserve to have the best care made available to them, and pet insurance helps makes this a reality.

We know how distressing having a seriously ill or injured pet can be, and covering costs for treatment is really the last thing that you want to be focusing or worrying over.  Knowing that you can afford the very best treatment possible can be a great comfort at such times.

So Pet Parents, pet insurance is certainly something to think about!

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

The warmer seasons bring out the sun, smiles and….paralysis ticks!

The paralysis tick may be small but it can cause huge problems for your pet. Once attached to a host it produces a potent toxin that can cause potentially fatal paralysis in dogs and cats.

Being located on the east coast of Australia, North Ryde ticks all the boxes for this pest, as it loves warm, humid conditions. Consequently, as local pet owners, is it essential that you are aware of paralysis ticks, and to how to best safeguard your pet.

What does the paralysis ticks look like?

They have eight legs, are blue to light grey in colour and can grow from 2mm in diameter to over 1cm in diameter (when engorged with blood).

How can I protect my pet?

Talk to the Dr Paws North Ryde veterinarians about the tick control treatments for your pet. It is important to speak to professional and purchase the right treatment, as some dog products are highly toxic to cats.

Tick control products do help minimise the risk of your pet picking up a tick, however they do not provide 100 per cent protection. Therefore, it important to take other preventative action, and know what to do if something does happen.

You can also discuss tick removal during your consultation. There are certain tools that can be purchased for “home” tick removal but this is something to be discussed with a professional.

Below are some further helpful tick tips.

Try to avoid tick habitat:

  • Don’t take your dog walking in bush or scrub areas as these places are home to native animals, who are natural tick hosts
  • Keep lawns and shrubs trimmed short
  • Remove compost matter from your backyard

Frequently check your pet’s skin:

  • Remove collars
  • Check their entire body
  • Pay close attention to the body from the front legs onwards as the armpits, neck, face and ears in particular are heaven for ticks
  • Look for red, raised or thickened areas of skin
  • Feel for small, wart sized or lumps
  • If you do find a tick, don’t stop looking! If there is one tick, there are likely to be more…        

What are the symptoms of tick paralysis?

  • Wobbly back legs
  • Difficulty rising from the ground
  • A change in the sound of their bark or meow
  • Coughing
  • Vomiting
  • Drooling
  • Loss of appetite
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Quicken breath
  • Grunting noises
  • Any other out of character behaviour

What should you do if I find a tick or my pet shows symptoms?

Bring you pet into our clinic as soon as possible.

If a tick is found it should be removed immediately, either by yourself (if this is something you have discussed previously during a consultation) or by one of our Dr Paws veterinarians. The aim to quickly but carefully remove the tick by it’s head, which is the point of their attachment to the skin, so a confident hand should do it!

On the way to Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic:

Keep your pet calm

Make sure your pet remains at a comfortable temperature (not too hot or cold)

Do not offer food or water, the tick’s toxin can affect the airways.

Paralysis ticks have the potential to cause great harm to pets, and distress for Pet Parents.  We are here to help, so if you have any further questions or want further information about tick paralysis prevention, please feel free pop into the clinic, or give us a call on 02 6583 5366.

We are your partner in petcare!

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

A safe home is a happy home!

When pet-proofing one’s home or yard, it is important to look at items from your pet’s standpoint and consider what they are likely to play with, chew, or otherwise get into.

If you believe there are any items that may potentially be dangerous for your pet it is important to remove or relocate them accordingly.

It is a great idea to pet proof your home before bringing home a new pet, however, it can also be done during a home improvement project or at any given time.

There are many things in the house that your pet needs to avoid digesting. This is especially relevant when it comes to gardening or household cleaning chemicals. Toilet bowls should also be considered. Pets are often tempted to drink from the toilet bowl and if bowl cleaners have been used the water may poison them, not to mention drowning is a potential threat. However, any danger can easily be avoided by keeping the toilet seat lid down when not in use.

It may also be tempting for pets to climb into open dryers as they are warm to rest in. If your dryer is easily accessible for your pet, it is always a good idea to make sure the dryer’s door is closed and check inside before starting if the machine.

Fire hazards are also worth considering. For example, candles should never be left unattended as pets may potentially knock them over or catch their tail on fire. A fire screen could also be installed in front of any fireplaces, and electrical cords should be out of your pet’s reach in order to avoid electric shocks if they chew them.

It only takes small steps to protect the ones you love and your pet will thank you for it!

If you need any help or questions answered, please feel free to contact us as we are always here to help for your pet care needs.

 

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Ever wondered why your cat eats grass?

Many cat owners have noticed their cat at one point or another eating grass and throwing up not long after. The good news is, this is not a cause for concern. No evidence has been found to suggest that ingestion of grass will harm your cat. In fact, there are many benefits!

 

Relieving upset stomachs

The reason your cat vomits shortly after eating grass is because they do not have the necessary enzymes to digest large amounts of grass. However, as part of the throwing up process, your cat is able to eliminate indigestible matters such as fur, feathers, parasites or bones from their digestive tract, allowing them to relieve an upset stomach. This is useful for cats as they eat their prey as is, including both the edible and inedible parts.

 

Diet supplement

Grass juice contains folic acid which is an essential vitamin for cat’s bodily functions and increases oxygen levels in their blood. Therefore, if you find your cat eating grass, they may just be looking for a vitamin boost!

 

Laxative benefits

Eating grass can help your cat have regular bowel movements. This is especially helpful if your cat has fur clogged in their digestive tracts.

 

Although ingesting grass can be very beneficial for cats, it is important to keep any grass treated with pesticides or fertilizer away from your cat. If this is the case, or your cat is an indoor cat, there are also small trays of grass just for cats that you can buy. Cats will typically self-regulate the amount of grass they eat. However, please call us if you have any concerns or questions.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

What is Arthritis?

Osteoarthritis (arthritis) is a condition involving the degeneration of the joints where cartilage loses its ability to act as a shock absorber and the fluid in the joint becomes thicker, making it more difficult to move through. Although more common in older pets, there are other factors that put your pet at risk of developing arthritis. Picking up on risk factors early means your vet can put a management plan in place to delay the onset and ease the symptoms. Often your pet will be asymptomatic (not show symptoms) until the later stages of disease progression.

Risk Factors

• Joint trauma or surgery – misaligned joints, such as hip or elbow, dysplasia put added pressure on cartilage causing it to deteriorate sooner.

• Genetic predisposition – certain breeds, such as Labradors and German Shepherds, are genetically predisposed to this condition

• Excess weight – carrying extra weight puts excess stress on the joints causing arthritic changes to occur earlier on

• Age – general wear and tear of the joints will also develop arthritis.

• High impact exercise- dogs partaking in activities, such as jumping and running, can be at a higher risk for developing arthritis earlier on in life

Common Symptoms of Arthritis

• Reluctance or reduced tolerance to exercise

• Difficulty rising from rest

• Licking joints

• Reduced quality of life

• Limping or stiffness

• Behaviour changes

• Difficulty climbing stairs

• Lethargy

• Reduced energy

Arthritis Management Options

1. Regular Check-ups

As part of your annual health check, your vet will check the range of movement in the joints most commonly affected by arthritis. X-rays are also an option as they can provide a clearer picture of disease progression. As your pet ages, it is important they undergo a check every six months.

2. Diet or Supplements

Your vet may recommend a specially formulated diet or supplement to support the metabolism of healthy joints. These foods or supplements have a high fish oil content, which acts as a natural anti-inflammatory, whilst also providing a complete and balanced diet (food) or supportive nutrients to joints (supplement).

3. Disease Modifying Osteoarthritis Drug (DMOAD)

DMOADS have been proven very effective in managing arthritis. A few major benefits are listed below:

• Targeting synovial joints

• Improve blood flow and therefore nutrient uptake in the joints

• Decreasing inflammation

• Speeding up the metabolism of cartilage

All assist to help delay the onset of the disease if used proactively or alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life in the later stages of the disease.

4. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAID’s)

As the name suggests, this drug will help alleviate the most obvious of arthritic symptoms – inflammation and pain. It plays a vital role in alleviating pain and improving the quality of life.

5. Bedding and Environmental Changes

Warm, supportive comfortable bedding will allow better circulation to the joints, alleviating some of the stiffness when your pet rises from rest. Memory foam and/or heated beds are most effective. Changes to the environment, such as a ramp where you have stairs or lifting your dog into the car, will make an arthritic dog’s life slightly more comfortable.

6. Exercise

It is important to stay active, so low impact exercise such as easy walks or swimming are strongly recommended. Avoid high impact activities, such as jumping, chasing balls and any games that involve a lot of twisting and turning.

7. Complimentary Therapies

Alongside conventional medicine, these therapies may also help alleviate your pets symptoms; acupuncture, massage, hydrotherapy.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Cats, like us, need exercise to shed extra weight and maintain good health. And also like us, the consequences of carrying around extra weight are serious, ranging from osteoarthritis and high blood pressure to decreased life expectancy.

Watching what your cat eats is a given - healthy diet, healthy cat, right? We know that moderate portions and healthy foods are important for them just as they are for us. But a healthy diet isn’t enough. Without the other side of the equation - proper exercise - our cats won’t be fit.

Where do you start? Approach your cat’s ‘workout regime’ with a few key points in mind. First, cats are natural hunters. Their ancestors used to stalk prey for their meals. Second, they’re also notoriously lazy. Your cat is happy to spend most of its day lounging in a sunbeam. It’s up to you to help your cat overcome that urge. Finally, your cat doesn’t have a very long attention span. Keep that in mind when it’s time to engage them in play.

Here are a few tips to coaxing your cat toward a daily workout:

Combine Mealtime and Playtime

Play to your cat’s natural instinct to ‘stalk’ their food with simple toys that parcel out goodies as they engage in a little fun. A simple cardboard box filled with a small bit of dry food and a few holes can keep your cat active during meal time. Feeding your cat on top of their cat climbing tree is another great way to get a little extra exercise in at meal time – as is feeding them at the top landing of a set stairs.

Devote Time Every Day

Devote time every day to exercise your cat. Keep the sessions short - 10 to 15 minutes in active play. Fishing rod toys, toy mice, motorised toys and other toys can keep your cat moving. Even a flashlight can get your cat active. Just remember to let your cat catch what they are stalking occasionally or they could get bored and move along.

Use What’s Lying Around the House

Of course, scratching posts and cat trees can entice your cat to keep moving. But a few open boxes or a few empty toilet paper rolls can keep your cat moving too. Pay attention so none of it turns into a choking hazard. Remember that the best type of exercise for your cat is object play. Cats love their toys. The right type of play will not only keep their bodies fit, but their minds sharp as they pounce, tumble, hunt, paw or stalk across the living room.

Climbing to the Next Level

Most cats love to climb and any climbing activity, if undertaken regularly, will help to improve your cat’s fitness levels. The best climbing trees provide many and varied levels, scratching and climbing options. Scratching is great way to expend energy – so look for a climbing tree that includes a post which allows your cat to scratch at full stretch.

If you can provide sturdy and safe shelving for your cat to climb up, then do so. There are also plenty of pieces of cat furniture available in pet stores that can help you to help your cat get elevated.

Adjust With Your Cat’s Age

Younger cats may initiate playtime and will likely stay engaged longer than older cats. Older cats - or overweight cats - may not have the endurance to stick with it. But remember that any time you can spend benefits your pet.

Tips to Take Away

  • A healthy diet isn’t enough - cats, like people, also need exercise.
  • Use your cat’s instinct to stalk to coax him or her to exercise.
  • Make 10 to 15 minutes a day to actively engage in play with your cat.
  • Don’t push your cat too hard – know when to stop (no panting).
     

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

Surprisingly, around 85% of dogs over 3 years old have significant dental disease. If left unchecked, dental disease can end up causing significant health problems for a dog. Ideally, the best way to avoid problems like these is to invest in a small amount of preventative care to reduce tartar build-up and stop bacterial infections of the gums. There are many options available to owners to proactively improve the oral health of their dogs. There are also several ways that dog owners can help prevent the build-up of plaque in the first place.

Plaque and tartar in dogs

Dogs develop plaque on their teeth when saliva, food particles and bacteria come together. If left untreated, this plaque combines with minerals in the mouth to become hard tartar that will eventually cause decay, gum disease and other ongoing oral health issues. Tartar that has built up over time is hard and has to be removed by a vet with specialised equipment. To prevent your dog’s dental health getting to this point, there are techniques you can use to remove any plaque that has started to form and stop any more developing.

Cleaning your dog’s teeth

Giving your dog’s teeth a regular brush is a great way to prevent plaque build-up. Make sure to use toothpaste specifically designed for dogs and never use your own toothpaste, as it contains ingredients which can upset your dog’s digestion. If your dog isn’t already used to the idea of getting their teeth brushed, it is unlikely they will accept the experience straight away, so you’ll need to ease into it over time.

Start by using your finger to rub the top and bottom of their teeth and gums. Once they’re used to that, you can slowly begin to introduce a toothbrush. However, make sure you allow your dog to adapt at their own pace. Slowly build up the amount of time spent brushing, gradually introduce a toothbrush into the routine and only begin really cleaning your dog’s teeth and gums properly once they are comfortable with the process.

Ideally, you should brush your dog’s teeth daily or weekly. Also, be sure to brush over your dog’s gum line, as this is where plaque and tartar stick. Another excellent way to combat plaque is to give your dog dental treats that can help loosen plaque and remove debris as they chew.

A change in diet to a formula specifically catered to dogs prone to dental health issues can also be a great way to clean your dog’s teeth – especially when they are still getting used to daily teeth brushing. Specialised formulas reduce the build-up of plaque and tartar due to the kibble’s texture having a brushing effect on their teeth.

When to see your vet about your dog’s teeth

If you’re finding that you’re unable to solve your dog’s problem with plaque and tartar build-up, it’s a good idea to visit your vet for advice and further treatment.  Your vet can check your dog’s teeth and provide an oral care and dietary program.

If needed, vets also offer comprehensive care for dental issues including teeth polishing and ultrasonic de-scaling. They can also perform more advanced treatments including surgical intervention. Check with your vet to find out the best ways to improve your dog’s individual dental health and management strategies.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

If your cat’s breath smells bad, you might have more of a problem on your hands than putting up with a foul smell. If you’re noticing your cat’s breath producing a strong, unpleasant odour, this isn’t normal and warrants further investigation. Ongoing bad breath in a cat can be due to a variety of health problems. In fact, around 75% of cats over the age of three have dental disease, and smelly breath is usually one of the first signs pet owners notice.

Dental disease

Odour-producing bacteria building up in your cat’s mouth will most likely be the cause of your cat’s bad breath. Saliva and bacteria form plaque that can then mineralise and become tartar if not treated. This can lead to periodontal disease that is an infection of the supporting tissues of the teeth. Excessive brownish tartar, drooling, difficulty eating or favouring one side when chewing, plus inflamed gums are signs that your cat has dental disease that should be addressed by your vet.

Diet

Dietary issues can contribute to bad smelling breath with foods, such as fish or liver based ingredients, contributing to the smell. Cats may also accidently chew on foreign objects like rubber bands resulting in particles becoming lodged in their mouth. This is an easy problem to solve though. All you need to do is change what you feed them.

Gingivitis and Stomatitis

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums. Stomatitis is an inflammation of the mucous linings of the mouth. Cats are prone to developing these conditions, usually due to dental disease, but sometimes due to other bacteria, viruses or allergies. Your vet can advise you if your cat needs further testing to check for infections such as FIV and Calicivirus.

Metabolic diseases

Sometimes bad breath is more than just poor oral hygiene. In certain, less common cases it can be a red flag to more serious internal conditions such as kidney disease, particularly in elderly cats. A build-up of toxins in the blood can lead to bad breath, as your cat’s kidneys become overwhelmed and are unable to detoxify effectively anymore. Other conditions which could cause bad breath include diabetes and liver disease. If you have concerns, a simple trip to the vet is the best way to check your cat’s health.

How to treat bad breath in cats

The first thing to do if you notice that your cat has persistent bad breath is to book an appointment with your vet. There are so many potential causes of this symptom: you will save yourself a lot of time, effort, distress and money by having your vet give you the proper diagnosis and course of action early, and if your cat has a serious problem, you’ll help improve their quality of life.

However, most likely your vet will discover a minor problem and treatment will involve little more than a thorough dental cleaning and giving your cat a diet that helps prevent dental disease.

Preventing bad breath in cats

The best way to deal with a problem like bad breath is to treat the problem before it begins. Most oral hygiene issues in your cat can be solved by keeping your cat’s teeth clean, and just like with us, the best way to do that is to brush their teeth. It helps to remove plaque before it has time to properly form on the teeth and reduces the occurrence of gum inflammation.

Many cats will allow you to brush their teeth – especially if you start them young. Your vet will have great advice on what equipment and products to use, but one thing to remember is that you should never use your own toothpaste on your cat. Cats normally will respond badly to the flavour and the ingredients may upset their digestion.

When you start training your cat, let them lick the feline toothpaste off your finger. Once they’re happy to do that, start to hold their lip up as they lick. When they’re comfortable with that, start to touch their teeth with the brush and reward them with a treat. Do this for short periods of time at first, but build up every time until your cat will let you start brushing their teeth.

If you’d like another way to help keep your cat’s teeth healthy, talk to your vet about using an oral health diet.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

We are so excited to be Open and Operating!

Here at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic, we aim to become a partner in petcare for our pet community. We welcome all small animals and pet owners to pop into the clinic, whether to ask for advice- or simply to meet the team and say 'Hello!'

For your convenience, we have listed our clinic details (including Opening hours!) below:

 

Address

384 Lane Cove Road

North Ryde NSW 2113

Tel:  02 9888 1833

 

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

Hours

Monday 8:00am - 8:00pm

Tuesday 8:00am - 8:00pm

Wednesday 8:00am - 8:00pm

Thursday 8:00am - 8:00pm

Friday 8:00am - 8:00pm

Saturday 9:00am - 5:00pm

Sunday 9:00am - 1:00pm

 

Don't forget to connect with us on Facebook and Instagram!

We want to meet you and your pet, so we're offering FREE vet consults (value of $79) for new clients!


Regular check-ups are a great way to keep your pet looking and feeling their best!

 

Call us on 9888 1833 to book or click here to request an appointment with Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic.

 

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Skin problems are among the most common reasons cat and dog owners seek veterinary advice. Being itchy due to skin problems can cause a lot of discomfort for dogs, and sometimes skin problems may also be a sign of other underlying health issues.

The most common causes of skin problems in cats and dogs are allergies from parasites like fleas, environmental allergies, and adverse food reactions.

 

1. Fleas

Dogs are sensitive to fleas and can develop allergies causing serious skin disease. Flea allergies can be quite severe, even if fleas are not seen on your dog. Pets with flea allergies are allergic to the flea saliva and become very itchy after being bitten. Use of flea prevention products under the direction of a veterinarian can help prevent itchiness associated with flea allergy dermatitis. As well as treating your dog, it is important to also treat the surrounding environment. As 90% of the flea population live off your dog, treating areas where your dog spends most of its time is important e.g. pet bedding, vacuuming the house if your pet is welcome indoors.

 

2. Mange

Mange is a skin disease caused by several different species of mites. Mite infections tend to be non-seasonal – they can occur all year round. Some species of mites are found in the skin and hair follicles. The signs of a mite infection depend on which mite is present and skin lesions can occur anywhere on the body. Demodectic mange tends to cause hair loss, bald spots and sores. Sarcoptic mange causes intense itch with hair loss, reddened skins and sores.

 

3. Ringworm

Despite the name, ringworm is not caused by a worm but is a fungal infection. It’s also highly contagious and can spread to other animals and humans, so it’s important to seek advice from your vet if you suspect your dog is infected. Ringworm lesions in dogs typically appear as circular, crusty bald patches. Treatment can involve medicated shampoo or oral medications depending on the severity of infection.

 

4. Food Allergies

Dogs can become allergic to the food they eat. Food allergies in dogs are typically to protein, with the most common offenders being beef, dairy, chicken and egg. Dogs with food allergies usually have very itchy skin on the face, feet, ears and around the anus. Some dogs may also have gastrointestinal signs of food allergy including increased bowel movements and vomiting. In order to diagnose a food allergy, your dog will need to be exclusively fed a diet that it is not allergic to for a period of 8-12 weeks; this is called a food elimination trial. The diet chosen by your veterinarian may contain proteins that your dog is not allergic to or a commercial hydrolysed diet, where the proteins are so small the body does not mount an allergic react to them. When your dog is taking part in a food elimination trial, it is important not to feed it any treats or human food as this can interfere with the results.

 

5. Environmental Allergies

Environmental allergies are typically seasonal and occur in young dogs less than three years of age. Environmental allergies are usually genetic and are more common in certain breeds. Contact with environmental allergens such as pollens, grass or dust mites cause intense itch of the face, feet, ears, chest and tummy. Environmental allergies are often diagnosed as a matter of exclusion. This means that adverse food reactions, flea allergy dermatitis, infection, and other causes of skin problems may have to be ruled out before the problem is attributed to environmental allergens. Dogs can also be tested for environmental allergies with either an intradermal skin test or a blood test. Limiting your dog’s exposure to an environmental allergen is ideal but not always practical! Environmental allergies are managed with a combination of medications, medicates washes, environmental changes, and diets that support the skin.

 

6. Bacterial Skin Infections

Bacterial skin infections are often a complication when dogs are suffering from another allergy caused by fleas, their environment or food. They can occur when your dog scratches and breaks the skin allowing bacteria to infect the wound. Your vet will be able to determine the type of infection and treat it accordingly.

 

7. Yeast Infections

Yeast is commonly found on the skin of dogs, particularly in the ear canal, between the toes and around the anus. Dogs with floppy ears are most at risk, but all dogs can be affected. The yeast organisms are opportunistic; this means they take advantage to grow and infect the skin when the conditions are right. Infections can occur in high humidity (e.g. Summer), after swimming or as a secondary infection to allergic skin disease. Yeast infections cause itchy skin with hair loss, reddened areas and thickening of the skin. Skin lesions are usually accompanied by an offensive smell. Yeast is a fungus and infections are usually treated using ear ointments and medicated shampoos.

 

8. Dandruff

Dogs like people can get dandruff. Dandruff in dogs is usually caused by dry skin or skin irritation. The quality of food that we feed our dogs can reflect in their skin and coat. As the coat and skin are constantly being shed and replaced, the skin has a high need for protein. Feeding your dog a diet that contains high quality sources of protein is essential for healthy skin and coat. Diets that are high in omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, contain certain vitamins (e.g. B group vitamins) and minerals (e.g. zinc) have been proven to support healthy skin and coat in dogs.

 

9. Autoimmune Disorders

Sometimes skin conditions that won’t heal are caused by underlying immune disorders where your dog’s immune system attacks cells in its own body. Canine Lupus and Pemphigus are examples of autoimmune diseases in dogs. Skin lesions are usually severe with ulcerations and crusting, and your dog may be overall unwell. Your vet will be able to diagnose and advise treatment.

 

Visit your vet

The causes of skin issues can vary widely. Only a veterinarian can diagnose, treat and make nutritional recommendations for a pet with dermatologic disease. Nutrition can play an important role in management of all skin disease, in particular environmental allergies and adverse food reactions. Additionally, feeding a high-quality diet can support healthy skin and help prevent recurrent skin disease in dogs.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

As the weather heats up and the days get longer there are a number of things responsible pet owners should be thinking about to keep their pets safe over summer. A big one is snakes. Every year in Australia, over six thousand pets are bitten by a snake. Normally, snakes will go out of their way to avoid you, and if you spot one, it’s best to lead your dog or cat away if you can.

 

However, dogs and cats are usually curious by nature. A lot also have natural hunting instincts that will cause them to go after a snake rather than avoid it. That’s why it’s best to take precautions to stop you having to pull your pet away from a snake in the first place.

 

When you’re in the park during snake season – especially if it’s near water or a good food source, keep your dog on the lead so you can control them. At home, keep your garden areas tidy by clearing undergrowth, filling in holes, mowing the lawn and clearing away all the toys and tools that make great hiding places for snakes. It’s also a good idea to store firewood away from the house. If you’ve got a food source that attracts rodents, it will also attract snakes, so clean up any spilled food or uneaten pet food.

 

If your pet does get bitten, try and keep them as still as possible and get them to a vet as quickly as you can. The sooner they are treated with antivenom, the more likely they are to survive. Do not try and capture the snake or kill it, but do try to remember what the snake looks like if you see it as this can help your veterinarian a lot in treating your pet.

 

Snakes can vary in pattern and colour a lot – so much so that sometimes even experienced handlers have trouble being sure what type of snake they’re looking at. So, don’t put yourself or anyone else at risk trying to get a better look at a snake. It’s more important to get your pet in front of a veterinarian as quickly as possible.

 

Of course, your pet may come across a snake when you’re not there, so it’s important to know how to recognise if your pet has been bitten. Snake venom can cause your pet to vomit, shake or be suddenly weak. It can also initially present as something as apparently minor as dilated pupils. If at any stage during summer you notice any of these symptoms in your pet, if they start behaving strangely or appear unwell, it's important to have them checked for a snake bite right away.

 

Don’t think of this as an overreaction. Snake bite injuries in cats and dogs are surprisingly common in Australia, whether you live in the inner city, in the suburbs or out in the bush. If you are in doubt, it’s always better to get your pet checked.

 

If they have been bitten, time is a factor in determining whether they will survive, so get them to a vet as quickly as possible. Your vet will run a test that can rule snake bite in or out right away and it’s better to be safe than sorry.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

If you own a pet, heading away for a holiday can involve the sad moment where you have to drop them off at a cattery or a kennel – or leave them with a friend to be looked after. But it doesn’t have to be like that. There are plenty of places that are pet-friendly and let you bring your furry friends with you.

 

Before you travel though, it’s important to be prepared. Start by making sure your pets are up to date with their vaccinations and worming. Certain places you travel to may also pose a health risk for your pet. Have a chat with your vet about where you are travelling. They can let you know if your pet needs any extra protection or if there is anything you should be looking out for.

 

For example, if you’re planning to holiday in certain parts of the East Coast of Australia it is a good idea to make sure your pets are up to date with tick preventatives, as this area is home to a specific type of paralysis tick.

 

If you’re planning to drive, make sure that your pets are safely secured in the car. It is very dangerous to have unsecured animals in your car – for you and for them. Not only can animals behave unpredictably if they get a fright, but if you are forced to stop suddenly they may get thrown around inside the car in a way that could harm them and you.

 

Smaller animals should be placed in travel cages that are safely tied down with a seat belt or secured to the floor. Larger animals should wear a harness that is secured with a seat belt. If you have a station wagon or an SUV, large animals can also travel in the back, as long as they are secured with a harness or a solid cargo barrier is in place.

 

Travel sickness can be a common problem for both cats and dogs. The simplest way to overcome this issue is to avoid feeding your pet for a couple of hours before you start driving.

 

If your pets suffer from travel sickness your vet will be able to suggest other options such as anti-nausea medication. And remember that hot cars and pets don’t mix. Always take your pets with you when you leave your car – even if it’s only for a few minutes.

 

If you are planning to fly somewhere with your pets, a bit more preparation is required. The cargo hold of an airplane can be quite an overwhelming place for a cat or a dog, so the more you can do to put them at ease, the better. For example, get your pet used to their travel cage before you travel by encouraging them to sleep in there for a week or two. You should also talk with your vet about whether your pet should be medicated during the flight as this can help them relax and make the trip more enjoyable for them.

 

Before you travel, check with the airline to see what time you need to drop your pets off and whether to drop them at the airport or somewhere else. Also make sure that the travel cage you put them in is approved by your airline.

 

Once you arrive at your holiday destination, remember to watch out for the wildlife. Dogs and cats can cause great harm to other animals if allowed to roam free. On the other hand, there are plenty of animals that might harm your pets. Check with the locals to see if there are any particular creatures to watch out for, but always keep an eye out for animals such as snakes, jellyfish, crocodiles and even kangaroos.

 

Your pets will also be in unfamiliar territory, so it’s important that you keep them properly secure so they don’t run away and get lost. Dogs should be kept either indoors, on leads or behind reliable fences. Cats should be kept indoors, on leads or in a secure cat enclosure. It’s also a good idea to make sure your pet is microchipped and that those microchip details are up to date.

 

Here’s a checklist of essentials that are worth taking with you:
 

  • Pet food
  • Bedding
  • Toys
  • Treats
  • Bowls for water and food
  • Poo bags for dogs
  • Litter tray for cats
  • Grooming equipment
  • Towel
  • Shampoo
  • An ID tag with your accommodation details on it

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

As a lot of pet owners who live close to New Year’s Eve celebrations will know, fireworks can be very stressful for cats and dogs. It’s not a coincidence that lots of animal shelters are filled to capacity on January 1st every year. It’s why it is always a good idea to make sure your pet has been microchipped. Plenty of frightened pets escape from their homes as they try to flee the noise and light they don’t understand.

As part of your preparation for an evening with a big fireworks display, give your pets some vigorous exercise earlier in the day so they’re nicely tired out. As the sun begins to set and the time draws near, the best thing you can do for your cats and dogs is give them a safe, comfortable environment with plenty of welcome distractions.

If you’re planning to be home during a big fireworks display keep your pets with you so they feel reassured. Once you hear the display begin, try and keep to your normal activities so your pets see a normal routine and distract them by hiding a few treats they have to hunt for, playing with them or giving them their favourite chew toys.

If you’re going to be out while the fireworks are going off, make sure your pets are safely secure inside your home somewhere that will minimise the chance of them hurting themselves or damaging anything of yours. Ensure you provide plenty of water and food, as well as a litter box for cats. Also, try to return home to check on them as soon as you can after the fireworks have finished. They’ll find your presence very reassuring.

Some pets get so distressed by fireworks that they may cause serious injury to themselves when they hear the explosions. If your pet is like this, it’s well worth talking to your vet. There are a number of pharmaceutical options your vet can prescribe that will help reduce your pet’s stress levels. That way you can spend nights like New Year’s Eve celebrating rather than worrying about your pets.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

Summer has well and truly arrived: Keeping your pet cool in the heat  

'Tis the season for hot weather and we want to ensure that the furry members of our pet community beat the heat- so they can enjoy their Summer and this wonderful time of year!

Here are some useful tips to keeping your pet cool as the weather heats up:

  • Make sure your pet has access to cool, shady areas. It is ideal to bring pets indoors on hot days!
  • Provide plenty of fresh, cool water in large water containers. Be sure to provide numerous sources of water in case one is spilt. 
  • Walkies should be enjoyed in the coolness of the early morning or evening, especially on very hot days. Remember, if the footpath is too hot for you to walk on in bare feet, it's too hot for your pet!
  • If your pet seems to be in discomfort, try wetting their feet and misting water onto their face. Remember- dogs and cats control their inner temperature through their paws!

 

A Summer tip from Dr Matt:

Pop your pet's dry food in an ice-cream container and keep it in the freezer overnight. The next day your pet will be able to enjoy a chilled meal, and also be kept busy and entertained at dinner time- the food will take them longer to eat! 

Please dont hesitate to contact us on (02) 9888 1833 for more information about keeping pets cool in Summertime! We are here for you and your pet.

 

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Welcoming a new puppy into your family is an exciting and sometimes challenging period while your new puppy explores and adjusts to the new environment. Being prepared and involving the whole family in early planning will certainly help make the experience more enjoyable.

Before bringing your puppy home, there are some essential items you will need.

Food and water bowls: Food and water bowls need to be size appropriate and durable.  Teething puppies love to chew! Stainless steel or ceramic bowls are great choices.

Puppy food: Choosing the best diet for your puppy is important to help ensure their healthy development. We recommend feeding a size-specific diet to suit the expected adult size of your puppy. Your puppy requires specific nutrients in specific quantities to reach their optimal size and maintain their health.

Collar with ID tag & lead: Ensuring your puppy has a collar and identification tag will help reunite you should your curious puppy wander off without you. Getting your puppy used to a collar and lead will be beneficial once you head to puppy training classes.

Toys: Choosing appropriate toys is fun and a great way to involve the whole family. Choose toys that are size-appropriate for your puppy. Avoid toys with small attachments that could be swallowed or pose a choking hazard. Rubber chew toys tend to be more durable and excellent for teething puppies.

Bed: Choose a bed that will suit your puppy as they grow into adults. The puppy’s bed is their safe, rest place so should be comfortable and located in a quiet area.

Brush/comb: Some dog breeds require regular grooming. Having a suitable brush or comb can help prepare your puppy for grooming and handling sessions.

Another important task is to puppy proof your home. Puppies are inherently curious and love to explore. It is important to ensure that your home is safe and secure (both inside and out). 

Inside the house

Make sure all cleaning products are out of puppy’s reach and food is safely stored away.  Electrical cords are often tempting items to chew on, so hide these away from curious puppy eyes. It is generally very good practice to put away anything you would rather your new puppy does not chew on (eg shoes, children’s toys, etc).

Outside the house

Storing all chemicals, including insecticides, herbicides, fertilisers as well as paints and solvents in a lockable area will help keep your new puppy safe. Your property should be secure with solid fencing that your puppy cannot dig under or climb over. Some plants can be toxic to puppies so please seek advice from your Veterinarian. And finally, ensure there are no hazardous areas that your puppy could injure itself on.

Other things to consider:

Choosing a Veterinary Clinic  

Your Veterinarian is an important part of your puppy’s life. They will help ensure that your puppy grows into a healthy adult and member of your family for years to come. It can be very beneficial to both you and your puppy to make a meet-and-greet appointment even if your puppy is not due for vaccination yet.

Remember to bring along any paperwork that your breeder or pet store might have provided.

Introducing your puppy to children

Children often don’t understand the need to be very careful with a puppy, so a responsible adult should always supervise. When you bring your puppy home, have the children sit down and let the puppy come to them.

Introducing your puppy to existing pets

Try to introduce the puppy on neutral territory, such as a park.  Make sure both dogs are on leads and permitted to sniff and investigate each other. Avoid scolding your older dog(s) if they do not react positively at first. Allow plenty of time for them to become accustomed to each other.

Animals have their own rules, and your older pet will certainly let your young puppy know what the rules are. Everyone must be allowed a territory where they are not disturbed. Cats, in particular, must be allowed to rest in peace and quiet out of the puppy’s reach and to get acquainted with their new housemate on their own terms.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

It's amazing how quickly cats will take to certain foods, while they will remain thoroughly uninterested by other foods even though to us they seem virtually identical.

To us, cats seem to be some of the pickiest pets when it comes to their food. So knowing how your cat chooses its food is the best way to ensure that you can find exactly what your cat will eat and to fulfil its nutritional requirements based on age, lifestyle and breed.

How Cats Choose Their Food

Cats don't have the same number of taste buds as humans, so they use their other senses when selecting their food. Cats use three senses to decide whether or not they will eat something:

1. Smell

A cat's sense of smell is their primary way of interacting with food. They will usually sniff the food before eating it, and food that smells unappealing will be rejected. Cats have 60-70 million olfactory receptors whereas humans have 5 million. This is why smell is so important to cats when selecting food.

2. Mouth Feel

The way food is grasped and feels in your cat’s mouth has a major impact on whether or not they will pick it up and eat it. Each cat will have different preferences - some will prefer soft food in jellies or gravy that is easy to chew and swallow, while others will prefer dry, harder to chew food.

3. How It Makes Them Feel After They Eat It

The ratio of protein, fat and carbohydrate can impact how your cat’s body feels after it breaks down the food. This ratio, often referred to as the Macronutrient Profile (MNP), determines the optimal ratio of energy derived from the three macronutrients and helps provide a positive post-digestion sensation.

If you’re finding it difficult to find a food your cat prefers, you can try a one-off food trial. For example, simply put out a small amount jelly and gravy textured food and see which food your cat selects. This will help you buy the one your cat prefers.

With dry foods, look out for products that address the specific needs of fussy cats: Smell, texture and how your cat’s body feels after eating. You can do the same one-off trial with the dry food, which again will help you find out whether your cat is mainly driven by smell, texture or the digestive sensation.

Common Feeding Misconceptions

  • Variety Is Important. Myth: We humans may love variety, but cats don't have the same need. That's because, while we have 9,000 taste buds, cats have only 500. Also, changes in your cat’s diet can cause digestive upsets, which is why we recommend sticking to a single formula.
  • Cat’s Select Their Food on Taste. Myth: You’re not alone if you think your cat favours flavour. A recent survey with cat owners showed us that 99% of Australian owners feel their cats favour flavour. In actual fact cats primarily select their food based on smell, texture and the digestive sensation. Flavour plays quite a small role.
  • High Protein Diets Are Bad. Myth: High quality proteins like fish, beef, and chicken are excellent for cats. It is well known that cats need a high protein diet to gain much needed nutrients like the essential amino acid, taurine. High quality protein – i.e. highly digestible protein - is key to a healthy diet for cats.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

We love sharing clinic developments with our wonderful pet community, including the introduction of our new online booking software - EzyVet!

Our new software has been designed with the client and patient experience in mind, this is something that we believe is of the utmost importance.

If you haven’t booked an appointment online since the change, we’ve put together a quick ‘How-To’ guide to get you started…

 

  1. Click ‘Your first time logging in? Sign up here!’
     
  2. You’ll be taken to the Sign Up page to enter your details and create a password.
     
  3. If you’re a current client of the clinic, these details will match with the ones we have on record at the clinic – easy peasy!
     
  4. On the next page, enter your address, agree to the T&Cs, confirm you’re not a robot and then click ‘Sign Up.’
     
  5. You’ll be taken to your Dashboard. Here you can see your pets’ details, upcoming appointments and outstanding invoices. You can also add additional pets from this page.
     
  6. To book an appointment, you can either click the button in the top right corner or left menu bar.
     
  7. Follow the prompts to the calendar where you can select your preferred appointment date & time.
     
  8. Once you select your appointment time, you can then select which pet the appointment is for and add any extra notes you would like the clinic to know.
     
  9. After clicking ‘Confirm,’ your appointment will now display as an ‘Unconfirmed Appointment.
     
  10. A message will be sent to the clinic, where a team member will click ‘Confirm.’
     
  11. You will receive a confirmation email shortly after booking. 
    * Please regard this as confirmation of your appointment. Your Dashboard may take some time to update.

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

We worry about our pets when we leave them on their own while we’re out, but what about when they’re right there with us: spending time outdoors, playing at the park, on a walk?

Invisible, dangerous diseases that can be debilitating, or deadly, if your pet is not vaccinated.

Vaccinations can help protect your puppy, dog, kitten or cat from some extremely dangerous and contagious diseases in the animal world.

If you’re thinking your unvaccinated pet will be safe from diseases simply by avoiding sick pets, think again. Unfortunately, infectious viruses and bacteria can be left behind where a sick animal coughed or sneezed and if your pet then sniffs or licks that area soon after, they may be vulnerable to infection.

After your pet’s initial course of injections, it’s important they receive an annual booster vaccination. Not only will the yearly appointment give you an opportunity to chat with your vet and discuss any other health or behavioural concerns you may have, it’ll help ensure you and your four-legged friend continue to live a long and happy life together!

What do dog and cat vaccinations actually do?

Vaccinations contain inactive strains of certain viruses or bacteria and help your pet’s immune system create antibodies to fight off the same virus or bacteria should they ever come in contact with it again.

Dog vaccinations

In Australia, dog vaccinations help protect your dog or puppy from:

  • Canine Parvovirus
  • Canine Distemper
  • Canine Hepatitis
  • Canine (Kennel) Cough

Cat Vaccinations

In Australia, cat vaccinations help protect your cat from:

  • Feline Enteritis
  • Feline Respiratory Disease (Cat Flu)
  • Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV)
  • Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV / Feline Aids)
  • Feline Chlamydiosis

Dog and Cat Vaccination Schedule

If you’re the parent of a new puppy or kitten, they’ll require three initial vaccinations at eight, 12 and 16 weeks of age. From then on, they’ll require a yearly health checks and booster vaccination for life, to ensure they’re fully protected.

After their first vaccination, it’s considered safe for your pup to visit controlled environments, like puppy school, as long as all other puppies are all vaccinated and wormed. It is advised to avoid socialising your puppy with any unvaccinated dogs until at least five days after their third vaccination. Kittens should be kept indoors until they’re fully vaccinated.

If other dogs have been fully vaccinations and are up-to-date, the socialisation is encouraged.

If you’re unsure about your pet’s vaccination status, chat with your vet for a recommendation.

The common types of vaccinations for dogs include:

  • C5 Dog, covering parvovirus, distemper, hepatitis, parainfluenza, bordatella
  • The C5 vaccination is the most common option for puppy owners and required by most boarding kennels and dog clubs.

The common types of vaccinations for cats include:

  • F3, covering enteritis, calicivirus and rhinotracheitis
  • F4, covering enteritis, calicivirus, rhinotracheitis and chlamydiosis
  • FIV 

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Whether your kitten is your first or an addition to your current pet family, your kitten will rely on you to ease the transition from their mum and littermates to your household. Keeping your kitten safe and comfortable takes planning and patience from everyone in the family. It is always a good idea to keep a collection of the basics before your new kitten arrives. But before thinking of buying any new supplies make sure your house is secure and safe.

Inside the house

Indeed, cats are curious by nature, and to keep them out of trouble hide away any electrical wires or power cords and even consider restricting access to particular areas of the house. Store away any household chemicals (including cleaning products) and even ensure that the lids to the toilets are down. Put away any small objects that could be swallowed or pose a choking hazard. Safety first!

First steps at home

When your kitten first arrives home let them explore the house.  It takes time to adjust to the new sights, smells and sounds of their new home environment. Vocalisation is normal as your kitten explores their new environment.  Some kittens benefit from being restricted to one room initially and gradually permitted access to other areas of the house as they get more settled.  Set up a litter tray in the same room to help facilitate litter training.

Introducing your kitten to the rest of the family

Make sure children are supervised at all times. Teach your children how to handle the new kitten with care and respect. The best way to pick your kitten up is to slide an open hand under their tummy as your other hand supports their rear end. It is best that children don’t pick them up by themselves unless shown properly.  Time to play? When it comes to play time, encourage your children to use toys, this keeps the activity enjoyable for everyone.

Introducing your kitten to other pets

When introducing your kitten to other pets in the house, keep your dog calm and on a lead. Cats are territorial so they may take some time to adjust to your new kitten. Ensure they all have safe areas to escape and hide when they need to.

Choosing the right food

We recommend feeding a kitten food that suits the developmental stage of your kitten. Kitten food needs to provide plenty of energy for the highly active, growing kitten as well as providing nutrients that support their immune system.

Other essential items:

Water bowl: Make sure you have fresh, clean water available for your kitten at all times.  Some cats will have a preference to bowl size and type (eg stainless steel or ceramic).  Start by offering both options and see which your kitten prefers.

Kitten Toys: Only use toys that are specifically designed for kittens. Avoid toys with small attachments or parts that could be swallowed.  Stay away from balls of string or wool.

Bedding: Sleep is very important for your kitten’s development. Comfortable bedding is essential and some kittens will prefer an igloo or covered bed to hide in.   Interesting tip:  Most cats enjoy high positions so providing a second bed option at a safe height for your kitten may be of benefit.

Scratching post: If you want to keep your furniture safe, an indoor cat tree is essential. You can even spray it with catnip or synthetic pheromones to encourage them using it.

Litter box: Is your litter box the right size for your kitten? Make sure they can use it without making a mess. Also remember to buy a scoop. Remove any waste at the start and the end of every day and replace the litter every 1 -2 days.  Interesting tip: provide your kitten with both a covered and non-covered option at first so they can choose what they prefer.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

Many dogs have a reputation for eating just about anything, but sometimes you may notice your dog has a very particular palate and may screw their nose up at most things you put in front of them. If you have a dog who's always been fussy, then there's no "magic cure," but there are things you can do to help encourage them to eat.

Tip 1: Make sure they are healthy

Sudden loss of appetite can be an indicator that your dog is unwell. If they're not normally fussy eaters but suddenly stop eating, the first thing you should do is talk to your vet. They may be ill, or if there have been lots of changes around the house lately, they may just be stressed. Another possibility is they might have a problem with their teeth or their mouth. Dogs can have tooth decay and infected gums just like humans. If their mouth is sore, they'll be less likely to want to eat.

Tip 2: Change the menu

Once you've ruled out illness, the next thing to do is look at what you're feeding them now. This may seem obvious, but the most common reason your pet won't eat is they don't like the food they are given. If this is the case, the simple solution is to start looking into alternatives for your dog, whether that is changing the quality of their diet or switching from a dry to wet diet. If you are planning to change their diet, remember to do it gradually over a period of a week so their digestion has time to adjust. Begin by serving a meal comprised of 20% new food, and slowly adjust the ratio of new to old over a seven-day period until you're serving 100% new by day seven.

Tip 3: Feed them small serves at regular times

Dogs are creatures of habit. They respond well to being fed at the same time every day. Use a measuring cup to make sure they're getting the same amount every time. Keep the portions small and only leave the food there for half an hour. If it doesn't get eaten, take it away. Healthy dogs won't starve themselves and will eventually eat when they are hungry. The other upside of this is you won't be leaving a bowl full of food lying around that ends up spoiling and being wasted.

Tip 4: Don't give them your scraps

It can be tempting to give your dog scraps from your plate or off cuts from food you're cooking, but this not only spoils their appetite and encourages inappropriate begging behaviour, it can also be really bad for their health. Super Premium dog food has been specifically formulated to give your dog all the nutritional support they need to live a healthy life. Scraps off your plate will most likely not be well balanced, so will cause your dog to fill up without getting all the nutrients they need.

Tip 5: Make their meals more tempting

Dogs have an acute sense of smell, but only a limited ability to taste things. Where humans have around 9,000 taste buds, dogs have less than 20% of that number. If you want to tempt a dog, it's not about making their meal taste nicer, it's about making it smell more appealing.

If you mainly feed your dog dry food, the simplest way to make that more appealing is to add a little water to help release the aromas. Of course, wet dog food has a much stronger aroma and can be even more tempting, so if you really want to tempt them, feeding them a diet of only wet food is the best option. Wet food does cost a little more, so there's always the option to serve them a combination of wet food mixed in with the dry kibble. This has the added benefit of helping to keep their teeth free from tartar build up.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

Don’t brush pet dental health aside! We are talking all things Dental at Dr Paws North Ryde

Just like in people, pets can also develop dental disease! That’s why we are focussing on the importance of taking care of your fur friend’s pearly whites.

Over time bacteria containing plaque builds up on your pet’s teeth, and if not removed it can harden into tartar, resulting in infected gums and dental disease. Bacteria from dental disease can have a detrimental effect on your pet’s overall health, as it can travel through the bloodstream to affect their heart, kidneys and liver.

Seeing or smelling something funny? Warning signs of dental disease include:

 

-Bad Breath

-Yellowish-brown tartar on teeth

-Reddened gums

-Drooling

-Difficulty in eating, swallowing or dropping food

 

Prevention is the best cure for dental disease, so here are some ways to ensure good oral hygiene for your pet.

 

Teeth Brushing

Daily brushing of your pet’s teeth is the gold standard. This is something that is best introduced early in life and helps remove plaque and reduce bad breath. Sound daunting? We can discuss brushing with you and help you introduce it into your home care.

 

Regular Check-ups

Just like we require regular dental visits (industry standard is every 6 months) to ensure optimal dental health, the same goes for our fur friends.

 

A professional dental scale and polish every 6-12 months is also recommended, even with good home care.

 

Diet

Improving your pet's dental health could be as simple as making a change to their diet.

Dental diets are specifically formulated to help keep your pet's teeth clean, while still providing them with a balanced diet.  Each piece of kibble is larger than standard dry food, specifically designed to encourage chewing.  This motion aids in the breakdown of plaque on your pet's teeth.

 

Dental specific foods can also assist with…

Tartar Control. Effectively helps reduce tartar through the inclusion of a specific nutrient that effectively reduces plaque deposits
Helps to prevent urinary crystals
Helps to maintain a healthy digestive system
Hairball Regulator

 

Dental Specific Treats

Specially designed dental treats are made to help remove plaque and bacteria from teeth before it turns into tarter. Their shape and texture help to scrape the teeth and remove plaque, and some treats additionally contain an antibacterial to help rid the mouth of tartar causing bacteria.We recommend treats such as greenies and oravet chews.

To read more about your pet’s dental health download our dental brochure here, or ask our friendly staff for more information.

Call us to request a quote, or for more information about dental appointments and procedures. Alternatively, submit a form here and our friendly staff will be in contact.

Is your pet a golden oldie?

If your furry friend is seven years or older, then they are classified as a ‘senior’ pet, or as we like to say a ‘golden oldie’!

Just like us, as animals’ age their body changes- and so do their petcare needs. As pet parents it’s important to be aware of each phase in our pet’s life, and what they need in order to stay happy and healthy. After all, it makes sense that the needs of a puppy will be different to that of an older, more distinguished, family member!

We are here for you and your pet. If you have any questions or queries about how to look after an aging pet please do not hesitate to contact us! Below we have also detailed some key information when it comes to keeping your older pet as comfortable as possible when it comes to their mobility.

Mobility tends to become an issue for senior pets, they may lack the movement and energy they once had. This is a natural part of aging, however there are some health conditions that can directly affect a pet’s mobility. The good news is they are treatable, and taking the time to address them will have such a positive affect on a senior pet’s quality of life and even life expectancy!

Arthritis

Arthritis is a common condition seen in senior pets, the result of increased joint inflammation. It can be very painful if left untreated, hinder a pet’s mobility and become detrimental to their overall wellbeing and happiness. Some signs of arthritis to look out for include:

-Difficulty getting up after resting

-Decrease in activity level

-Reluctance to jump up or down (such as into or out of the car)

Obesity

Carrying excess weight is furthermore detrimental to pet’s mobility, as it puts additional strain on already sensitive joints. Did you know that every extra kilo an animal carries in weight is equivalent to 5kgs of weight on each joint?!

If you think that your pet may be suffering from the above conditions, or you feel they need a health assessment as they head into their senior years, please contact us. We will perform a senior health check- focussing on all the key areas including teeth, eyes, weight, mobility and more. We will also create a tailor-made mobility management plan, to keep them feeling comfortable and staying active.

Mobility plans can include:

Regular check-ups

Regular checks-ups are vital for senior pets in order to monitor their changing health requirements.

Special Diet and Supplements

The introduction of a specially formulated mobility diet is key to increasing pet mobility. Royal Canin mobility food has been designed for senior pets and contains ingredients such as turmeric extract, and collagen, which have been scientifically proven to significantly improve pet mobility. This food is perfect for pets with arthritis or general joint stiffness and pain. Additionally, supplements are available that can provide joint support and increase mobility in our older patients.

Exercise plan to help with weight and joint function

We can help equip you with techniques to ensure your pet stays active and maintains a healthy weight to ensure optimal joint function.

Alternative therapies

Additional therapies we can recommend or offer, if relevant to your pet’s health, include anti-inflammatory medication and Cartrophen injections to treat arthritis.

 

Call us today to book in a health check for your senior pet! Alternatively, fill out a form here and we will be in contact with you.

 

Serving the pet community of the City of Ryde. The purrfect location for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

We would like you to get to know our head vet Dr. Ema Bowman! 

Dr Ema is our head veterinarian and, alongside your regular team of caring vets including Dr Bernie, Dr Janet and Dr Jen, is looking forward to meeting your pet, as well as leading and developing the clinic as we move into the new year!

Dr Ema is available for consults on Tuesday, Wednesdays and Thursdays. You can book in to see Dr Ema with your fur child by calling us on 9888 1833 or booking online via our website homepage!

Don't forget to 'LIKE' our Facebook Page to stay up-to-date will all clinic changes, we will be frequently sharing photos and updates!

Long nails can cause pain for pooches if left untrimmed, which is why it is important to monitor your fur friend’s paws.

Over time, long nails can curl downwards and cause damage to pet’s skin. They can also put pressure on toe joints resulting in pain and sometimes even arthritis.

Daily exercise on hard surfaces, such as concrete, will help file down pet’s nails naturally. However, if your pet tends to play on softer surfaces their nails may grow long and require a trim.

We recommend coming in to visit us so we can trim your pet’s nails, and demonstrate the process to you. To maintain your pet’s nails, here are our 5 easy steps for trimming them at home:

How to trim your pet’s nails

  • Before starting, ensure you are using nail clippers of the right size specially designed for pet nail clipping.
  • Gently restrain your pet in a comfortable position.
  • Hold your dog’s paw firmly but gently.
  • Start by cutting small amounts of nail until you see the white inside the nail, and a small black dot in the centre (black nails won’t have this, so be careful to not cut too much).
  • Stop cutting when you can see this small black dot, as you do not want to cut too far and into the sensitive portion of the nail.

Clipping tips

  • Make sure your pet is used to having their paws handled from a young age so that they comfortable with this contact.
  • Use a pair of blunt hair scissors or ideally electric clippers to remove excess hair around the toes, so the long nails are easier to identify.
  • Ensure nail clipper are parallel to the nail and avoid cutting across the nail.
  • Use their favourite treats afterwards to praise them for their good work.
  • Check your pet’s nails regularly to see how fast their nails are growing and to identify when they next need a trim.

Nutrition can also have an impact on the growth rate and health of your pet’s nails. Contact us if you are interested in a nutritional consultation and ensure your fur friend’s diet is tailored to their individual health needs.

Call us today for more information! Alternatively, fill out a form here and we will be in contact with you.

Serving the pet community of the City of Ryde. The purrfect location for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

We want to celebrate with you + your pet!

That's why we are offering each member of our pet community the choice between one of the below offers:

 

  • 1x FREE health consult (valued at $65)

  • 1x $50 OFF desexing

  • 1X $60 vaccination

All offers include a full nose-to-tail health check with one of our experienced and friendly vets!

 

To redeem contact our friendly team and quote 'Happy Birthday'!

 

T&Cs Apply. Offer valid until 14th July 2018. For feline and canine friends. Offers open to multi-pet households but are limited to one offer per pet :)

 

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic. We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Is your cat thirstier than usual? Drinking from places they normally wouldn’t- or shouldn't?!

This could be a symptom of kidney disease.

If the kidney is damaged through old age or toxic injury, it loses its ability to concentrate urine. As a result the body cannot conserve enough water and your pet will drink more in order to stay hydrated.

Functions of kidney:

  • Removes waste products from the blood
  • regulate blood pressure
  • regulate blood sugar
  • Balance the bodies fluids
  • regulate pH levels
  • Create hormones that control the production of red blood cells

Often, the kidney will find ways to compensate as it loses functionality. This means your pet may not show signs of disease at all until damage is considerable.

Early detection is key and it is important for pets, particular senior pets (7 years and older) that are prone to kidney issues, to have regular blood tests and urine tests. These tests will enable us to monitor kidney function, identify changes early, and maintain your pet’s health.

If you have noticed a change in your pet's thirst- please book an appointment with us! Call us or alternatively you can book online.

Alternatively, fill out a form here and we will be in contact with you.

We are your partner in petcare.

Serving the pet community of the City of Ryde. The purrfect location for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Family Fur Day

Come visit us at the Eden Gardens Family Fur Day next Sunday the 15th of July. The event will run from 9am – 5pm and there will be:

  • Talks from vets, including Dr Matt
  • Doggy treats
  • Pet portraits
  • + Fun activities for the whole family

Dr Matt will be talking about backyard dangers to avoid, distractions for bored pets and many other topics to help your animals enjoy the great outdoors.

See you there!

See here for more information.

We are your partner in petcare.

Serving the pet community of the City of Ryde. The purrfect location for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

Openpay payment plans now available!

We now offer Openpay!

Openpay allows you to bring your fur friend to visit us now, and then pay for the visit at a later date when it suits you best.

Openpay can be used to make smaller payments over longer terms, with a quick and easy approval process.

0% interest for 12 months

Click here to download the brochure and learn more about Openpay.

Call us for more information! Alternatively, fill out a form here and we will be in contact with you.

We are here for you and your pet.

T&Cs apply. Ask our friendly team for more information.

Serving the pet community of the City of Ryde. The purrfect location for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

5 ways to maintain dental health -  from tasty treats to a dog toothbrush!

 

1. Regular dental checks at the veterinarian
2. Scale & Polish treatments
3. Brushing (that’s right- a dog toothbrush!)
4. Diet
5. Chews

 

Regular Dental Checks 

Regular dental checks at the vet will ensure that any concerns can be quickly identified and addressed before they develop into something more smelly, serious- and often painful!

We offer free dental checks, and recommend these be performed every 6 months.  During these checks our friendly nursing team will show you how to grade your pet’s teeth, and also how to care for your pet’s teeth at home

 

Scale & Polish

A dental check may discover that those pearly whites show tartar build up, and are in need of a scale and polish. This treatment is often necessary in order to bring your pet’s mouth up to a point where home-care is possible and effective.

No dog toothbrush (even the cutest one!) is going to be able to remove the tartar, and so a professional scale and polish at the practice is the only answer!

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or queries about dental treatments available, we are here for you and your pet. We also now offer flexible payment plan services designed to make vet care stress free.

 

Tooth brushing 

To maintain a healthy clean mouth after a scale and polish, your dog will benefit from a dog toothbrush. We brush our teeth daily, and ideally our pet’s teeth should get the same treatment!

Dog tooth brushing at home ideally needs to be introduced from a young age, so your pet can be trained and become comfortable with the routine.

A dog toothbrush can come in many different shapes, sizes and colours, and we can help you select the best type for your pet, and show you how to use it.  Additionally, you will receive a dental kit from the practice.

A pet dental kit generally includes:

  • Micro-fibre finger cloth (to start)
  • Dog toothpaste
  • Double headed toothbrush or a finger brush

Below are some useful tooth brushing tips!

  • Familiarise your dog with the dog toothbrush by dipping it in tuna juice or water
  • Try brushing one or two strokes on a few front teeth to start
  • When it comes to introducing toothpaste allow your pet to taste the toothpaste on the brush before proceeding to brush
  • The first few brushes should be short (no more than a minute!)

 

We are here to support you and help ensure introducing a new dental regime is as easy as possible.  If your pet is mature aged, and you are not sure how to introduce brushing, if at all, please do not hesitate to contact us for advice.

 

Diet

Diet is key when it comes to maintaining strong, healthy teeth. During your pet’s free dental check we will discuss diet options with you. This could include introducing a dental specific dry food, such as the Royal Canin Dental range.

Specially formulated food is created so that the kibble (size, shape, texture) effectively has a “brushing” effect on the teeth- helping to remove plaque. Key ingredients also work to reduce plaque deposits, and assist joint health and digestion.

 

Chews

Dental chews, such as Greenies Dental Treats or Oravet, are a great option for pets. They are basically healthy rewards that can assist to improve oral health.

They assist to:

Clean teeth by using the chewing motion to wipe away plaque
Freshen breath
Maintain healthier gums

Greenies are also low in fat, and a nutritionally complete treat that will keep your dog entertained and stimulated.

 

If you have any additional queries about pet dental health or questions about our dental services- please do not hesitate to contact us. We are here for you and your pet.

Serving the pet community of the City of Ryde. The purrfect location for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

It can take as little as six minutes for a dog locked in a hot car to overheat with sometimes fatal results. If you know you are going to be away from your car for even a couple of minutes, it’s better to leave your dog at home where they are comfortable and have access to water. If your dog is with you and you have no other option, take them out of the car and tie them up in the shade with a bowl of water.

Common misconception

Ambulance Victoria conducted a series of tests on a 29-degree day that showed it only takes 10 minutes for the inside temperature of a car to rise from 20 degrees to 44 degrees. It then only takes another 10 minutes for the temperature to rise to over 60 degrees – an extremely dangerous level, especially for dogs. Common misconceptions include that tinted windows, parking in the shade or leaving the windows open reduce the risk to your dog– but this is not the case. None of these make a significant different to the inside temperature of a car.

Heat stress

If your dog becomes heat stressed they may start by panting, drooling or becoming restless. If they are in a bad way they will become weaker over time, their gums may change colour and they could begin to stagger, vomit or even have a seizure. If you notice any of these symptoms, take your dog to a vet immediately. If you suspect they are heat stressed, you should also try to bring their body temperature down at a steady rate. Begin by spraying cool water onto their body and using a fan. You can also rub water on their armpits, foot pads and groin. Be careful not to use ice though, as this may cool your dog down faster than is safe.

Remember to never leave your dog in a car on a hot day and have a safe and fun Summer with your pet.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to contact us at Dr Paws North Ryde Veterinary Clinic!

We are conveniently located for pet parents living in North Ryde, East Ryde, Macquarie Park, West Pymble, Marsfield, Eastwood, Deniston, West Ryde, Ryde, Epping and surrounding areas!

 

- Source from our supplier, Royal Canin. Ask our friendly staff for product information.

$100 ‘Welcome Home’ saving for new puppy owners!

We know how exciting bringing your new fur child home can be and we want to help you get your pup off on the right paw! If you have a new puppy under 6 months of age simply mention this post to get up to a total of $100 off your puppy’s care, which includes:

  • $25 off their first vaccination
  • $25 off enrollment in Puppy Preschool
  • $25 off their 3 month heart worm preventative injection
  • $25 off their 6 month heart worm preventative injection


To make a booking simply call our friendly team on 9888 1833 or jump on our website and book online. We look forward to meeting the newest member of your family!

 

Please note: Offer ends 28th of February 2019.